Mars 2020
Summary: 

 

 

Corbella: Trudeau's attempted power grab an alarming breach of trust (The Province)
Were Parliament to grant the government that power to tax and spend money without Parliamentary oversight they would have fundamentally changed the Canadian Constitution in a way that would be extremely deleterious to the operation of government in this country.

Worst-case scenarios aren’t the only scenarios (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
In February, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a conference call on COVID-19 and warned, as The New York Times reported, that 160 million to 214 million Americans could become infected and 200,000 to 1.7 million might die.

Government should be careful in using cellphone data to track COVID-19, advocates say (The Hill Times)
‘In normal times, most Canadians would respond to the collection and use of sensitive health and location information with a hard no. But these are not normal times,’ says professor Michael Geist.

How invoking the Emergencies Act could help Canada better track, contain COVID-19 (CBC News)
Emergencies Act would give government power to do things like using cellphone data to track exposure

Leaving no one behind with COVID-19 (Hospital News)
On the heels of the COVID-19 crisis, the federal government has now improved access to Employment Insurance, and some provinces, but not all, have discouraged employers from requiring sick notes. Banks have offered a six month payment deferral for mortgages and organizations responsible for workers’ compensation and occupational health and safety in some provinces have produced timely guidance material.

Now That Canada Is Rationing Masks, Trudeau Faces Backlash for Donating Medical Supplies to China (National Review Online)
Canada’s Official Opposition Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer took aim at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for shipping tons of medical supplies to China in February, calling the move “outrageous” with current concerns that Canada is running short on supplies amid its own fight against coronavirus.

Voici comment les profs peuvent enseigner à distance (L'actualité)
Les trucs et astuces d’une professeure de droit à l’Université d’Ottawa, qui offrait déjà une partie de ses cours en ligne.  

What does the COVID-19 endgame look like? Five simple steps (Macleans.ca)
Amir Attaran: Social distancing is the only option—there is no alternative. Here’s how we might eventually ease back into normal life, in a way that saves lives.

Coronavirus: How is Canada planning to enforce mandatory self-isolation? (Global News)
The federal government is deploying the Quarantine Act in the fight against COVID-19, imposing mandatory self-isolation rules for any traveller returning to Canada with fines and even jail time for those who break the rules.

Freedom-of-information requests shunted to sidelines during virus crisis (The Tri-City News)
OTTAWA — As government agencies across Canada focus strained resources on protecting people from COVID-19, efforts to respond to freedom-of-information requests from the public are slowing or even stopping altogether.

How invoking the Emergencies Act could help Canada better track, contain COVID-19 (CBC News - Canada)
The prime minister is called upon almost daily in the media scrum outside his home at Rideau Cottage to explain why the federal government has not invoked the Emergencies Act. Canadians perceive the COVID-19 pandemic to be an emergency and rightly so.

Ottawa Hospital starts rationing masks for staff as COVID-19 spreads (CTV Ottawa News)
OTTAWA -- UPDATE: A hospital source told CTV News Ottawa Thursday night that "staff will be meeting over the next week to discuss how to operationalize and the policy will not be immediately implemented.”

South Korean court delivers latest blow to e-cigarette makers (Nikkei Asian Review)
SEOUL -- E-cigarette makers in South Korea suffered a further setback after the Constitutional Court swiftly dismissed a petition by an industry body challenging the government's warnings against the devices.

COVID-19: John Tory sparks debate on possible use of cellphone data for infection detection (Financial Post)
As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads across Canada, a brief remark by Toronto Mayor John Tory has opened an emotional discussion on whether smartphone data can or should be used to help monitor people and check the spread of the disease.

Ottawa a envoyé des masques en Chine juste avant l'éclosion au Canada (Le Journal de Montréal)
Affaires mondiales Canada a expédié 16 tonnes d’équipements de protections médicales individuels en Chine le mois dernier pour lutter contre le coronavirus, alors que l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) avait déjà averti les pays à se préparer à une pandémie.  

Ottawa faces criticism for sending 16 tonnes of personal protective equipment to China in February (The Globe and Mail)
Canada’s department of Global Affairs shipped 16 tonnes of personal protective equipment to China last month to help Beijing fight the novel coronavirus, an effort that it undertook even after the World Health Organization had warned countries to prepare for possible cases.

Trump’s Irresponsible Rhetoric Is a Menace to Public Health (Strategic Culture Foundation)
The response from medical experts to the president’s irresponsible rhetoric this week about “reopening” the country has been overwhelmingly negative:

Trump Will Be a ‘One-Man Death Panel’ if He Sends People Back to Work Amid Pandemic: Medical Experts (The New Civil Rights Movement)
President Donald Trump’s stated desire to get America back up and running by Easter despite the continued threat from the coronavirus pandemic is running into a wall of criticism from medical experts.

Police reluctant to ticket, arrest COVID-19 rule-breakers  (Med News Ledger)
The government warnings to Canadians to keep their distance and stay home — especially if they have recently been abroad — are being delivered in the sternest terms.

The latest on the coronavirus outbreak for Tuesday, March 24 (CBC.ca)
Shortly after House of Commons proceedings began today, the chamber suspended itself while the Liberal government and opposition parties negotiate the finer points of a bill to deliver aid to Canadians during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Trudeau says government isn’t using cell phone data to curb spread of COVID-19 (MobileSyrup.com)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said that the federal government currently is not using cell phone data to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Trump Wants U.S. ‘Opened Up’ by Easter, Despite Health Officials’ Warnings (The New York Times)
“You can’t just come in and say let’s close up the United States of America,” the president said, insisting again that he did not view the coronavirus as any more dangerous than the flu.

Trump will be a ‘one-man death panel’ if he sends people back to work amid pandemic: medical experts (Raw Story)
President Donald Trump’s stated desire to get America back up and running by Easter despite the continued threat from the coronavirus pandemic is running into a wall of criticism from medical experts.

City of Toronto using cell phone data to curb spread of COVID-19: report (MobileSyrup.com)
Toronto Mayor John Tory has raised the idea of using cell phone data from carriers in an attempt to curb the spread of COVID-19 in the city.

Leaving no one behind with COVID-19 (Focusonvictoria)
ON THE HEELS OF the COVID-19 crisis, the federal government has now improved access to Employment Insurance, and some provinces, but not all, have discouraged employers from requiring sick notes. Banks have offered a six month payment deferral for mortgages and organizations responsible for workers’ compensation and occupational health and safety in some provinces have produced timely guidance material.

Legal casebook publisher offering students free access to ebooks in wake of COVID-19 (Canadian Lawyer Magazine)
As Universities transition to online courses and campus access is restricted, legal-casebook publisher Emond Publishing will offer temporary free access to ebook versions of its casebooks for students and instructors affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ontario woman barred from parole hearing of her father’s killer amid coronavirus concerns (Global News)
An Ontario nurse said that she is “devastated” after being denied the opportunity to attend a parole hearing for the man convicted of murdering her father, and that it’s traumatizing the parole board will hear the case without her amid the new coronavirus pandemic.

Ottawa health unit backs away from idea to mine cell phone locations to gauge distancing (Ottawa Citizen)
Ottawa Public Health doesn’t have a plan to analyze location data from cell phones to see if people are congregating during this unprecedented time of physical distancing, the agency’s leader said Tuesday.

'An extreme last resort': Police reluctant to ticket, arrest COVID-19 rule-breakers (CBC News - Canada)
The government warnings to Canadians to keep their distance and stay home — especially if they have recently been abroad — are being delivered in the sternest terms.

“President Trump Will Have Blood On His Hands” (Hot Air)
But if people are told they can head back to work, commuting by bus or subway while thousands of new infections are confirmed each day, “the virus will surge, many will fall ill and there will be more deaths,” said Dr. William Schaffner, a preventive medicine expert at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

A Coronavirus Vaccine Must Be Affordable and Accessible to the Public (The National Interest)
Globally, billions of dollars in public funds have been committed to a COVID-19 vaccine development. It’s crucial that the resulting vaccine be accessible to all.

At coronavirus task force’s daily briefing, New Yorkers told to self-isolate (The Daily Republic)
WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Tuesday, March 24, that he wanted to reopen the country for business by Easter, on April 12, despite widespread warnings from public health experts that the worst effects of the coronavirus were still weeks away and that lifting the restrictions now in place would result in unnecessary deaths.

Border closures may not be legal and won’t stop COVID-19 (The Peterborough Examiner)
Canada has announced unprecedented measures to restrict the movement of people across our borders as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

ANALYSIS: Expect Ottawa to declare national COVID-19 emergency only when premiers want one (Global News)
Time and again over the last week, at his now-daily press conferences, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been asked when he will declare a national emergency and, in so doing, give the federal government powers it does not presently have to respond to the novel coronavirus crisis.

Coronavirus vaccine must be affordable and accessible (The Conversation Canada)
The race is on to develop a vaccine to protect against COVID-19. Germany, the United States, the European Union and others have collectively committed more than a billion dollars. The race is on to develop a vaccine to protect against COVID-19. Germany, the United States, the European Union and others have collectively committed more than a billion dollars.

How did we miss the COVID-19 outbreak and what are we missing now? (IPolitics)
Given the unprecedented experience of what we’re living now, it’s jarring to look back to late January and early February, to a time when the word was relatively unstressed by a major disease outbreak in Wuhan, a Chinese city of 11 million people.

Rogers postpones residential service price changes due to COVID-19 (MobileSyrup.com)
Rogers has clarified that its residential service price changes that were planned earlier this year have been postponed due to COVID-19. Some customers received notices that their internet and TV package fees were increasing. University of Ottawa professor Michael Geist posted an image of the rate changes on Twitter asking the national carrier why it was increasing fees during “the biggest health and economic crisis.”

Rolling out a remote teaching plan on the fly (CBA National)
As universities around the world have moved to online classes in a global effort to contain the coronavirus, countless professors are scrambling to replace what’s left of their in-person courses with virtual ones.

What happens after the pandemic curve flattens? (The Globe and Mail)
Many governments, including Canada’s, have taken too long to recognize the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic when even days of delay can have large effects on the ultimate death toll. Our governments are only now recognizing that successfully flattening the epidemic curve means that we could be self-isolating for more than just a month or two.

Ottawa resists emergency powers as provinces present patchwork fight against coronavirus (Inside Ottawa Valley(Metroland Media Group))
What will land you in jail in Newfoundland is still legal in Nova Scotia. Prince Edward Island is closing its liquor stores, while Ontario keeps its booze and pot shops open. Restaurants are open, restaurants are closed, restaurants are open but at half capacity. Take-out only.

Tokyo Olympics: Health experts warn holding 2020 Summer Games too soon risks spreading coronavirus more (USA Today)
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told other world leaders last week he wanted the Tokyo Olympics his country is preparing to host to be proof that mankind could “defeat the new coronavirus.”

À l’Université d’Ottawa, c’est le dernier jour pour quitter les résidences (ICI Radio-Canada.ca)
C’est jour de déménagement ce dimanche dans les résidences de l’Université d’Ottawa. Des étudiants et leurs parents ont vidé les chambres, souvent à contrecœur. Ils se posent des questions sur la suite de l’année universitaire, alors que des cours en ligne ont été mis en place.

Canada should ensure cellphone tracking to counter the spread of coronavirus does not become the new normal (The Globe and Mail)

China kidnapped two Canadians. What will it take to free them? (Go Tech Daily)
Fifteen years ago, in the aftermath of the SARS epidemic, a medical researcher named Michel Chrétien and his long-time collaborator Majambu Mbikay hatched a hypothesis in their Montreal laboratory. A global cohort of scientists was waking up to the reality of a new generation of infections like SARS. Chrétien and Mbikay, researchers at the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM), believed a derivative of quercetin, a plant compound known to help lower cholesterol, was a “broad spectrum” antiviral drug that could fight a range of viruses. When an Ebola outbreak struck West Africa in 2014, the two scientists teamed up with the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg to test quercetin’s effectiveness on mice infected with Ebola—and found it remarkably effective.

COVID-19 : voici comment les profs peuvent enseigner à distance (Le Droit)
Cette semaine, les universités du monde entier ont opté pour des cours en ligne dans un effort mondial pour contenir le coronavirus. D'innombrables professeurs sont pris au dépourvu face au défi de transformer ce qui reste de leur cours normalement offerts en personne en cours en ligne.

Is it time to invoke the Emergencies Act to thwart COVID-19? (National Post)
Is it time for the federal government to invoke the Emergencies Act to help thwart COVID-19’s march across Canada, public health experts say. The question is, what would the government do with it?

Could Canada enforce coronavirus self-isolation? Legal experts say yes (Global News)
Over the past week, Canadian officials have urged the public to practice social distancing, self-isolate and quarantine during the coronavirus pandemic — but what happens if that advice is ignored?

Covid-19 : voici comment les profs peuvent enseigner à distance (The Conversation)
Cette semaine, les universités du monde entier ont opté pour des cours en ligne dans un effort mondial pour contenir le coronavirus. D'innombrables professeurs sont pris au dépourvu face au défi de transformer ce qui reste de leur cours normalement offerts en personne en cours en ligne.

More action urgently needed to ensure no one is left behind in COVID-19 crisis (St. Catharines Standard)
On the heels of the COVID-19 crisis, the federal government has now improved access to Employment Insurance and some provinces, but not all, have discouraged employers from requiring sick notes. Banks have offered a six month payment deferral for mortgages and organizations responsible for workers' compensation and occupational health and safety in some provinces have produced timely guidance material.

Alanis Obomsawin's 52nd film -- the fight for Indigenous health care (Rabble.ca)
It took one little boy, Jordan River Anderson, to ensure that thousands of First Nations and Inuit children can today receive the same standard of social, health and education services as the rest of the Canadian population.

Lawyers raise alarm on shoplifting settlement ‘shakedown’ (Law Times)
Retail store law firms are being suspected of demanding excessive settlements from alleged shoplifters via letters and aggressive phone calls.

How measures to contain COVID-19 may clash with Canadians’ Charter rights (The Globe and Mail)
​With Canada facing a pandemic that puts the health of millions potentially at risk, and governments imposing stringent measures, questions are being raised about what role constitutional rights play in times of crisis, and whether governments have the manoeuvring room to protect society. Sean Fine looks at the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in dangerous times.

Federal government looks to Emergencies Act for more powers to fight COVID-19 (The Globe and Mail)
Ottawa is reviewing powers contained in the Emergencies Act to see if there are additional actions it should take to protect Canadians in its fight against the coronavirus, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday.

Canada's emergency act, used only once in peacetime, would bolster federal powers (The New York Times)
OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday he was closely examining whether to invoke the rarely used 1988 Emergencies Act, which would allow Ottawa to override the provinces and restrict the movement of people and goods.

The Best Law Schools In Canada 2020 (University Magazine)

Ottawa can make quarantines mandatory — here's why it likely won't (CBC News - Canada)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that, for now, the government is asking returning travellers to self-isolate, not demanding that they do so — and experts say such a mandatory quarantine would come with enforcement headaches and complicated Charter of Rights implications.

In the face of COVID-19, we must understand Canada’s lockdown powers (The Globe and Mail)
As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, Canadian public-health officials have issued increasingly forceful guidelines. Various provincial medical authorities have advised against non-essential travel and recommended the cancellation of large gatherings. On Monday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced new measures, closing the Canadian border to people who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents; U.S. citizens are exempted.

Ethics, the law and a public health emergency (CBC News)
Canada is contending with a response of unprecedented scale to a public health emergency, and Canadians face enormous disruption to their lives. Health law and policy expert Colleen Flood spoke with The Sunday Edition host Michael Enright about the ethical, legal and civil liberties aspects of some of the drastic measures to slow the spread of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Social Distance (CBC NEWS)
(This segment begins at 34:58 / Ce segment débute à 34:58)

Éducation pour les francophones en situation minoritaire: l’héritage de l’arrêt Mahé (Acadie Nouvelle)

Why the coming battle over Canadian privacy reform starts at home (The Globe and Mail)
Canadian privacy law is now widely regarded as outdated and ill-equipped to address the challenges that arise from the massive collection and use of personal information. Canada’s private-sector privacy law was drafted in the 1990s, well before the advent of a data-driven economy, and the need for reform has grown increasingly urgent as Canadian law falls behind comparable rules around the world.

Taxpayer's use of derivative contract determines its treatment for tax purpose, SCC rules (Canadian Lawyer Magazine)
A taxpayer’s forward derivative contract was a hedge, not speculative, and so the taxpayer’s losses were capital and not income losses, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled today in a decision that is in “the national public interest,” says one tax law expert.

Mission : protéger les aînés (La Presse+)
Le gouvernement Legault annonce d’autres mesures afin de contenir la crise. Québec vise la protection des aînés, les plus vulnérables face à la COVID-19, en leur demandant de ne plus sortir de chez eux.

Des pouvoirs publics importants... mais limités (LaPresse.ca)
Les autorités sanitaires, tant au provincial qu’au fédéral, disposent de larges pouvoirs d’intervention pour juguler la propagation du coronavirus au sein de la population, mais leur marge de manœuvre juridique n’est pas illimitée.

Coronavirus: Could Canada impose strict travel bans? Experts say yes (Global News)
Could Canada impose the type of strict travel bans seen in China, Italy and the United States in response to the novel coronavirus?

“Arm’s-length” Military Institution promotes Belligerent Worldview (Dissident Voice)
Not satisfied with Canada’s largest public relations machine, the Canadian Forces also employ various “arm’s-length” institutions to push their influence over the discussion of military and international affairs.

Why Twitter Is Bad for Our Cultural Health (PJ Media)
I confess I was initially appalled by the name “Twitter” and vowed never to subscribe to a medium that called itself something so ridiculous. Nor could I understand how any self-respecting person would agree to “tweet” like a canary bird, originally in 140 — now in 280 — reductive characters, sometimes culminating in a catena of staggered entries. Indeed, the language was not only parsimonious—how could any serious thought unfold in such a discursive strait jacket?—but for the most part impaired, foul and expulsive, by no means a proper medium of intellectual exchange.

Après un désaveu en Cour fédérale, retrait de toutes les accusations contre le juge militaire en chef (45eNord.ca)
Après une longue saga qui remonte à janvier 2018, le Directeur des poursuites militaires, désavoué par la Cour fédérale le 3 mars, a finalement annoncé mercredi qu’il avait retiré toutes les charges retenues contre le juge militaire en chef, le colonel Mario Dutil.

Open Education takes a stand at TRU (The Omega)
Last week was Open Education Week at TRU, hosted by the Thompson Rivers University Student Union (TRUSU). Many events were held on campus, predominantly in the student union building, to raise awareness for Open Education.

Could Canada bring in mass coronavirus quarantine measures like Italy? (The Globe and Mail)
As Italy extends its widespread restrictions to include the closing of most shops, legal and public-health experts said this week that a similar order in Canada is unlikely.

No ethics rules broken by former top bureaucrat in SNC-Lavalin scandal: watchdog (Global News Radio)
The federal ethics commissioner says there is no reason to believe former Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick broke the conflict of interest law during the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Legal pluralism should not be cover for pursuit of judicial preferences: Fed CA Justice Stratas (The Lawyer's Daily)
Federal Court of Appeal Justice David Stratas cautions that judges should not develop public law to suit their own personal policy preferences, under the guise of engaging in legal “pluralism.”

Ecojustice alleges unfairness in 'secret' public inquiry into anti-Alberta energy campaign (CBC.CA News)
Ecojustice, an environmental law charity, is accusing the inquiry into anti-Alberta energy campaigns of unfairness for not following what it says are the basic rules of disclosure for a public inquiry.

30 ans et 30 conseils scolaires plus tard: l’héritage de l’arrêt Mahé (L'Express)
L’arrêt Mahé. C’est le jugement qui a «tout changé» pour les minorités francophones du Canada en quête d’une éducation en français, cruciale pour leur survie linguistique.

Éducation pour les francophones en situation minoritaire 30 ans plus tard : l’héritage incroyable de l’arrêt Mahé (Le Nord)
L’arrêt Mahé. C’est le jugement qui a «tout changé» pour les minorités francophones du Canada en quête d’une éducation en français, cruciale pour leur survie linguistique.

What is Canadian content? Addressing the question of definitions (The Hill Times)
The basic principle espoused in our report is simple: there should be consistent obligations to support Canadian cultural policy for all media content undertakings involved in similar activities, whether foreign or Canadian.

Facial recognition technology: privacy questions growing (Radio Canada International)
Several Canadian police forces have admitted to experimenting with facial recognition technology, but only after news investigations. Questions are arising about the use of this technology and whether it violates Canadian privacy laws. It also raises the spectre of an Orwellian future, to add to the other aspects of technological tracking of almost everything we do, buy, search for, write on the net, or places we travel to.

Oleh Sentsov brings his soft-spoken courage to Canada (The Ukrainian Weekly)
OTTAWA – Most film directors prefer to tell their stories through their cinematic creations and would much rather be behind the camera than in front of it. But a real-time drama, filled with tragedy, conflict and a relatively happy ending, made Ukrainian filmmaker Oleh Sentsov the unwitting subject of what has become the greatest story of his life, thus far.

Feds call on Canada's Big Three telecoms to slash cellphone prices by 25 per cent over two years (CTV News)
OTTAWA - The government on Thursday closed the loop on a campaign promise to lower cellphone costs for Canadians. Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Navdeep Bains said the government will demand that the Big Three -- Bell Canada (which owns CTV News), Rogers Communications Canada and Telus Communications -- lower their prices by 25 per cent in the next two years for cellphone plans that offer two to six gigabytes of data.

L’endroit le plus dangereux pour les femmes, « c’est leur propre maison » (ICI Radio-Canada)
Dans son rapport 2019, l’Observatoire souligne qu'identifier les éléments récurrents qui lient les cas de féminicides intimes entre eux devrait conduire à traiter ce type de meurtre comme un problème de société, plutôt que comme une multitude de cas « isolés » ou « sporadiques », commis par de « mauvaises personnes ». Il s’agirait aussi d’un premier pas vers une prévention mieux ciblée.

L'identité de manifestants mohawks transmise au CN par la police (ICI Radio-Canada)
La Police provinciale de l’Ontario (PPO) a remis le 14 février au Canadien National (CN) une liste qui dévoile l’identité de certains des manifestants mohawks qui ont participé au blocage des voies ferrées à Tyendinaga.

Facial recognition technology; privacy questions growing (Radio Canada International (en)
It has been revealed that facial recognition technology is being ‘tested’ by many police agencies in both Canada and the U.S.

Emergency isolation: What powers does government have to quarantine Canadians? (CTV NEWS)
OTTAWA -With the spread of the novel coronavirus driving Canadians to stock up on supplies — on the suggestion of the federal health minister — could we see a wide-scale quarantine in this country and what could that look like?

'We are in an information-deprived environment,' prof on coronavirus panel says (The Province)As the World Health Organization dances around the question of whether the novel coronavirus is a pandemic, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa warns that in order to create effective interventions, the public must have a common understanding of the word.

'We are in an information-deprived environment,' prof on coronavirus panel says (National Post)
As the World Health Organization dances around the question of whether the novel coronavirus is a pandemic, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa warns that in order to create effective interventions, the public must have a common understanding of the word.

‘Canada has lost a giant’: Liberal icon David Smith dies at 78 (The Hill Times)
David Smith, a former Senator who was behind two Liberal prime ministers victories over four elections, died last week at the age of 78.

Canada’s Heritage Minister: No, We Are Not Creating Legislation to Make News Websites Register With the Government (PressProgress)
Is Canada’s Heritage Minister getting ready to introduce a new bill that would force Internet news sites to register for a license with the Government of Canada?

Can the UK learn from how Canada appoints its judges? (Prospect Magazine)
In the spring of 2016, I had a long, caffeine-infused discussion with one of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s advisers about the process for appointing judges to the Supreme Court of Canada. The PM’s advisers reached out to a large and diverse group of academics and practitioners around this time. Trudeau’s first appointment was coming up and informal consultations were a necessary precursor to putting in place a new appointments process.

Costs orders against third-party funders: Promoting accountability (Lawyer's Daily)
Third-party funding in litigation is on the rise, both in Canada and abroad. This is an industry that remains largely unregulated. Unlike other common law jurisdictions, the courts in Canada have yet to pronounce themselves on a wide range of issues that stem from third-party funding, including such things as a court’s ability to award costs against a third-party funder. Arguably, the courts in Canada have painted themselves into a corner by imposing a legal test that makes it difficult to award costs against third-party funders.

Deepfakes Create A New Kind Of Nonconsensual Porn (VRrOOm)
A lineup of female celebrities stand in front of you. Their faces move, smile, and blink as you move around them. They're fully nude, hairless, waiting for you to decide what you'll do to them as you peruse a menu of sex positions.

Looming lawsuits, threats of job losses and other takeaways from the CRTC hearings on cell service (CBC News)
This week saw the end of a nine-day marathon round of public hearings that pitted dominant cellphone carriers against affordability advocates and smaller carriers.

Privacy Commissioner opens investigation into RCMP’s use of facial-recognition technology (The Globe and Mail)
A week ago, the office of the Privacy Commissioner – Daniel Therrien seen here on Dec. 10, 2020 – office and its counterparts in Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta announced they would also jointly investigate Clearview AI and its use of facial-recognition technology.

RCMP's use of Clearview AI facial recognition technology under (CBC.CA News)
One day after the RCMP admitted to using controversial facial recognition technology, the federal Office of the Privacy Commissioner is opening an investigation into whether its use violates federal privacy law.

Federal carbon tax deemed unconstitutional (Talk Radio AM640 (CFMJ))
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The USMCA cultural poison pill: Why the broadcast panel report could lead to millions in tariff retaliation (The Globe and Mail)
Michael Geist holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa’s faculty of law. He recently appeared before the federal government’s international trade and industry and science and technology committees to discuss the digital implications of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement on trade.

U.S. House passes bill that dramatically tightens tobacco regulation; Trump administration signals its opposition (Winston-Salem Journal)

Cancon up for renewed support as Ottawa readies culture bill (The Globe and Mail)
The Trudeau government will introduce legislation this spring that aims to bring cultural policy into the 21st century. But since the legislation is based on assumptions in place since the 1950s, Canadians must ask themselves whether those assumptions still hold.

Emergency isolation: What powers does government have to quarantine Canadians? (CTV News)
OTTAWA -- With the spread of the novel coronavirus driving Canadians to stock up on supplies — on the suggestion of the federal health minister — could we see a wide-scale quarantine in this country and what could that look like?

Facial recognition technology; privacy questions growing (Radio Canada International (en))
It has been revealed that facial recognition technology is being ‘tested’ by many police agencies in both Canada and the U.S.

L'identité de manifestants mohawks transmise au CN par la police (ICI Radio-Canada.ca)
La Police provinciale de l’Ontario (PPO) a remis le 14 février au Canadien National (CN) une liste qui dévoile l’identité de certains des manifestants mohawks qui ont participé au blocage des voies ferrées à Tyendinaga.

L’endroit le plus dangereux pour les femmes, « c’est leur propre maison » (ICI Radio-Canada.ca)
Jaël Cantin, Dahia Khellaf, Astrid Declerck… Chaque semaine, jusqu’à trois Canadiennes sont tuées parce qu’elles sont des femmes. On qualifie ces meurtres de féminicides puisque des caractéristiques communes les distinguent des homicides, en plus de les rendre prévisibles, en quelque sorte, donc évitables. Et si une approche plus ciblée pouvait aider à endiguer le fléau?

COVID-19: Quarantining Canadians (Newstalk 800 CJAD)
Canyon government into negotiate or senior member of the Quebec government someone who's has more experience at this I like jeff kelly I know John Chris Chan exactly those talk about this this morning and they'd be exact solution here is relationships right now what we're seeing is both at the federal level and at the provincial level we are lacking competent people who have the relationship because you can talk about politics so you're Blue in the face and strategy but it comes down to personal relationship It comes down to experience and where we've we've we've gone into this path politically where experiences almost said It's almost something that's you know you you shouldn't is negative now from the stands for sure and it will hew to the election the pack government as an example you we've basically elected government that is composed of ministers who have very little or no experience in the field responsible for and and so that shows an indigenous affairs each shows

Wireless costs in Canada (Talk Radio AM640 (CFMJ))
but from the perspective of both big help those in the leave for their perspective has long been every year that they don't have this new car kind of competition is yet another year where they profit I'm not having that kind of competition and there's every reason to believe they will use every legal means at their disposal to try to delay the prospect of some of these new competitors the game with Michael Geist at the University of Ottawa the fact leave while we're talking about you know e-commerce Internet laws and the wireless costing canada are prohibitively high and more competition would bring that down there saying it's already brought it down but you're saying still not enough we could do better and if the market were open up to more competition which gained echoes the competition Bureau the country so what would the possible next steps be Michael word this year you see has now concluded the court hearing there's some some additional violence and going to take place but and really in many respects it does now rest in their hands we wait to see what

Canadians can’t trust police using facial recognition responsibly: legal expert (The Lawyer's Daily)
The Mounties not consulting Canada’s privacy commissioner before using facial recognition technology “speaks to a broken system of privacy protection,” says a legal mind from the Ivy League.

L’endroit le plus dangereux pour les femmes, « c’est leur propre maison » (nouvellesduweb)
L’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) distingue quatre grandes catégories de féminicides, soit les crimes d’honneur, les crimes liés à la dot, les féminicides commis par une personne n’ayant aucun lien avec la victime et enfin les féminicides intimes. Au Canada, comme ailleurs dans le monde, c’est aux mains d’un partenaire intime que les femmes meurent le plus souvent.

Coronavirus outbreak: has Canada done enough? (CBC News)
Power & Politics speaks to Public Safety Minister Bill Blair about the government's response to coronavirus as well as the blockades. Plus, Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains on the government's plan to reduce cellphone bills, and Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister on why his government is reintroducing a carbon tax.

Feds call on Canada's Big Three telecoms to slash cellphone prices by 25 per cent over two years (CTV News)
OTTAWA -- The government on Thursday closed the loop on a campaign promise to lower cellphone costs for Canadians.

Oleh Sentsov brings his soft-spoken courage to Canada (The Ukrainian Weekly)
OTTAWA – Most film directors prefer to tell their stories through their cinematic creations and would much rather be behind the camera than in front of it. But a real-time drama, filled with tragedy, conflict and a relatively happy ending, made Ukrainian filmmaker Oleh Sentsov the unwitting subject of what has become the greatest story of his life, thus far.

Éducation pour les francophones en situation minoritaire 30 ans plus tard : l’héritage incroyable de l’arrêt Mahé (Le Nord)
L’arrêt Mahé. C’est le jugement qui a «tout changé» pour les minorités francophones du Canada en quête d’une éducation en français, cruciale pour leur survie linguistique.

30 ans et 30 conseils scolaires plus tard: l’héritage de l’arrêt Mahé (L'Express)
L’arrêt Mahé. C’est le jugement qui a «tout changé» pour les minorités francophones du Canada en quête d’une éducation en français, cruciale pour leur survie linguistique.

Ecojustice alleges unfairness in 'secret' public inquiry into anti-Alberta energy campaign (CBC.CA News)
Ecojustice, an environmental law charity, is accusing the inquiry into anti-Alberta energy campaigns of unfairness for not following what it says are the basic rules of disclosure for a public inquiry.

Legal pluralism should not be cover for pursuit of judicial preferences: Fed CA Justice Stratas (The Lawyer's Daily)
Federal Court of Appeal Justice David Stratas cautions that judges should not develop public law to suit their own personal policy preferences, under the guise of engaging in legal “pluralism.”

No ethics rules broken by former top bureaucrat in SNC-Lavalin scandal: watchdog (Global News Radio)

 

Matins sans frontières (radio-canada.ca)

L'interview du juge Michelle O'Bonsawin avait lieu à 8 h 21.

Release Date: 
Lundi, Mars 2, 2020
Content Groups: 
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