Février 2020
Summary: 

Canadian Gov't Mulls Forcing News Outlets To Be Licensed (Media Confidential)
The minister charged with modernizing Canada’s broadcast and telecommunications law says if the government is to adopt recommendations laid out by an expert panel, licensing enforcement likely won’t be applied the same way for small media groups as it will be for global tech giants.

Canadian open banking review turns to answering data security questions (Financial Post)
A committee advising the Ottawa on the feasibility of open banking here is about to turn its attention to the toughest part of the issue: How regulators and the financial sector can manage the data security and privacy risks.

Evening Brief: Canadian diplomats, dependents to leave China amid coronavirus outbreak (IPolitics)
Today’s Evening Brief is brought to you by Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. By working with the public, government and other stakeholders, CPA Canada is helping to navigate change and build a brighter future for us all. See how at cpacanada.ca/drivingchange.

Le rapport Yale sous la loupe (Le Devoir)
Fort attendu, le rapport du comité sur l’avenir des communications au Canada dévoilé mercredi en a surpris plusieurs par son audace. Si elles sont adoptées par le gouvernement, ses 97 recommandations redessineraient complètement le paysage numérique du pays. Regard interrogatif sur un document crucial, vu par plusieurs experts. Un texte de Guillaume Bourgault-Côté.

Licensing for media companies in Canada would likely be proportionate: Heritage minister (The Loop)
ÀThe minister charged with modernizing Canada’s broadcast and telecommunications law says if the government is to adopt recommendations laid out by an expert panel, licensing enforcement likely won’t be applied the same way for small media groups as it will be for global tech giants.

Morning Brief: Heritage Minister addresses new telecom report (IPolitics)
Today’s Morning Brief is brought to you by CADSI. Meet some of the dedicated people of Canada’s defence and security industry pursuing their passions to create innovative ideas that keep Canadians safe.
Our Canada – it’s all our duty. Visit MyNorthMyHome.ca

Telecommunications review includes ‘extreme’ recommendations, warns expert (IPolitics)
One expert is saying the federal government must reject many of the “ambitious” regulations proposed by its media and telecom review panel.

Trudeau Minister Proposes Forcing News Websites to Have Govt Licence (Breitbart)
Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault has stated that news websites, along with social media companies, could be forced to obtain government licences to operate in Canada.

Broadcasting report proposes to wreck the internet with insane hubris and mad regulatory overreach (National Post)
How could any group of seven apparently sane and certainly highly educated specialists believe that Canada will legislate into being a system of state control of communications as pervasive, as illiberal and as unfree as what they have proposed in the final report of the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review (BTLR), which they submitted to the federal government last week? By grossly expanding what is called “broadcasting,” the report’s authors aim at nothing less than a statist counter-revolution against the internet.

Canadian Minister U-Turns On Compulsory Media Licensing After Massive Backlash (Breitbart)
Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault has done a 180-degree turn on comments suggesting media organisations would be forced to have government licences after a huge backlash.

Feds have no intentions to license news organizations, Heritage Minister clarifies (IPolitics)
Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault says the Liberal government has “no intention” of licensing news organizations after drawing criticism for remarks he made over the weekend on the recommendations of the Yale report.

How vaping restrictions could send ex-smokers back to cigarettes (WHYY.org)
I started smoking when I was 15 years old — and from the beginning, I was in love.I connected to the ritual of it, the romance of it, the brief windows of solitude it offered — huddled on our back porch in the predawn cold, sending clouds of steam and smoke into the sky.

La Corée du Nord, vraiment? (Le Journal de Montréal)
L’importante réflexion sur l’avenir des communications au Canada lancée la semaine dernière par un groupe d’experts a déjà donné lieu à ses premiers dérapages et confusions.

Liberals say they will never licence news media. But here’s what they might do (THE STAR)
OTTAWA—Liberal star recruit and rookie cabinet minister Steven Guilbeault clarified Monday the Trudeau government will not move to licence news media organizations as he tried to contain political damage from comments he made in a weekend interview.

Minister walks back talk of licensing media, but CRTC overhaul plan still has critics worried (Financial Post)
Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault said Monday that the federal government has no plans to enforce a regulatory regime on Canadian media organizations after a report last week recommending vast new powers for the CRTC sparked concerns of regulatory overreach.

New report reveals shocking inequity in prisons and in the justice (The Hamilton Spectator)
How often do we think about our prisons? Inmates, and the reasons for their incarceration, are likely far from our minds. Designed to be out of society's sight and mind, prisons themselves are physically isolated.

RCMP resolves impasse, pays $56K bill related to Trudeau's trip to Aga Khan's island (CBC.CA)
The cost to the Canadian government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's controversial vacation on the Aga Khan's private island in the Bahamas increased to $271,000 when the RCMP wrote a cheque two weeks ago for $56,000 worth of meals, accommodations and jet ski rentals.

Top Ford government minister's office under scrutiny over social media spending plan (CTV Toronto News)
TORONTO -- The office of a top cabinet minister within Ontario Premier Doug Ford's government is under scrutiny for allegedly using taxpayer resources to conduct Progressive Conservative party business — raising questions about a possible ethics breach by one of the premier's key allies.

Trudeau Administration Proposes Government Licenses for News Websites… (Conservative Junction)
Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault has stated that news websites, along with social media companies, could be forced to obtain government licences to operate in Canada.

Trudeau govt backpedals on licensing of news websites after outcry (Lifesite)
OTTAWA, February 4, 2020 (LifeSiteNews) — Canada’s heritage minister backpedaled yesterday on comments published Sunday by CTV News that the Trudeau Liberals are considering forcing news websites and social media to obtain a government license to operate in Canada.

Group hopes French courses for lawyers, judges can boost access to justice in Saskatchewan (The Lawyer's Daily)
In a bid to improve access to justice for Saskatchewan’s French speakers, a small group of legal professionals in that province continues to offer lawyers a credit course in that language.
 

Indigenous achievers to be honoured at the Indspire Awards in Ottawa (Ottawa Citizen)
Every day, countless Indigenous professionals, activists, artists and cultural champions make immeasurable contributions to their communities and country.

Top Ford government minister’s office under scrutiny over social media spending plan (The Loop)
The office of a top cabinet minister within Ontario Premier Doug Ford's government is under scrutiny for allegedly using taxpayer resources to conduct Progressive Conservative party business — raising questions about a possible ethics breach by one of the premier's key allies.

Privacy watchdog takes Facebook to court over possible misuse of personal information (The Globe and Mail)
The federal Privacy Commissioner is taking Facebook Inc. to court over the possible misuse of the personal information of Canadians in a case that highlights the complex process behind the enforcement of the country’s privacy laws.

‘Tore my world apart:’ Indigenous Bar Association to honour Colten Boushie (larongeNOW)
Andre Bear remembers pain building deep inside him as he digested news of a controversial acquittal of a Saskatchewan farmer who shot and killed a young Indigenous man.

Online banking agreements protect banks, hold customers liable for losses, expert says (VIP Portal News)
Jeff Harney is one of hundreds of people who recently contacted Go Public after losing a fight with their bank — many saying they felt powerless against new electronic banking agreements they didn’t understand, couldn’t navigate and which they felt protected their bank from any liability.

Social justice lunatics celebrate Jordan Peterson’s struggles (The Post Millennial)
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson’s personal troubles are celebrated by his detractors. After his daughter, Mikhaila Peterson, opened up about the difficulties her father faced during this past year, a torrent of ill-wishes were released to social media. 

Think your new online banking agreement sucks? So does a contract law expert (Inter News Cast)
Jeff Harney is one of hundreds of people who recently contacted Go Public after losing a fight with their bank — many saying they felt powerless against new electronic banking agreements they didn’t understand, couldn’t navigate and which they felt protected their bank from any liability.

uOttawa law students make mental health a priority at Ottawa Law Classic (OBJ)
For a fundraiser that’s about helping our next generation of lawyers cope with stress and anxiety, it was pretty tense watching the final minutes of the Ottawa Law Classic charity hockey game held at the University of Ottawa’s Minto Sports Complex on Saturday night.

What a national action plan on gender-based violence might achieve — if Canada gets it right (Global News)
In 1995, then-secretary of state for the status of women Sheila Finestone opened a report on the federal plan for gender equality by urging action.

AGAR: The awful responses to Rush Limbaugh and Jordan Peterson ( Toronto Sun)
“Kick ‘em when they’re down,” is a nasty way to live and it says more about the one doing the kicking than the kicked.

Constitutions aren’t enough to hold countries together. We need a moral check, too (The Globe and Mail)
Errol Mendes is a professor of constitutional and international law at the University of Ottawa, and the president of the International Commission of Jurists, Canada.

Cuts to legal aid continue to harm vulnerable families and youth ( THE STAR)
Stephen Lecce, Ontario’s education minister, claims to be fully “committed to combating racism and improving equity and opportunity for [Black and racialized] children.”

Integrity complaint filed against Jim Karygiannis over secret recording, alleged (STAR)
Toronto’s bylaw enforcement officers were “inundated” with complaints made by the office of Coun. Jim Karygiannis, the department’s former head says.

March honours life of Colten Boushie, petition calls for inquiry into his death and trial (The Fulcrum)
This past Sunday marked two years since Gerald Stanley was acquitted of the murder of Colten Boushie, and nearly 100 people in Ottawa braved freezing temperatures that night for a vigil ceremony and demonstration that both honoured Boushie’s life and called for his justice.

No suggestion of preferential treatment in Scarborough-Agincourt ward, city spokesperson says (THE STAR)
The city of Toronto says it is “not aware” of residents being given preferential treatment regarding bylaw enforcement in the Scarborough-Agincourt ward, despite claims made by the ward’s councillor in a secretly made recording.

Peter MacKay’s powerful ally—a lobbyist with SNC-Lavalin ties (Macleans.ca)The strategist who has been working for decades to make Peter MacKay the prime minister is one of the high-powered lobbyists who tried to convince the Trudeau government to help SNC-Lavalin avoid a criminal trial for bribing corrupt officials in Libya.

RCMP ‘reviewing’ letter regarding Alberta government’s firing of election (THE STAR)
EDMONTON—Edmonton police say the RCMP are reviewing a letter sent by Democracy Watch that expressed concerns over the Alberta government’s firing of an elections watchdog who had been investigating the governing United Conservatives.

RCMP investigating UCP firing of Elections Commissioner (660News)
CALGARY (660 NEWS) – A possible investigation into the firing of Alberta’s Elections Commissioner is now in the hands of the RCMP.

Wall Street Is Buying Cigarettes (Vice (CA))
At the end of January, Adam Spielman, a London-based managing director at Citigroup, made a suggestion to clients in an email: Buy stock in Altria, one of the largest cigarette producers in the world.

22nd Century's FDA hearing results draw eye-of-beholder responses (Winston-Salem Journal)
22nd Century Group’s recent very-low-nicotine traditional cigarette presentation before the Food and Drug Administration has drawn mixed responses....

Cigarette manufacturers raise list prices for first time in 2020 (Winston-Salem Journal)

Grace Millane et la montée de la défense des ’50 nuances de gris‘ (newstrotteur.fr)
Le routard britannique Grace Millane a été étranglé à mort, entassé dans une valise et enterré dans une forêt néo-zélandaise après une date Tinder en décembre 2018.

Professors promote ideology, ignore evidence, when discussing prostitution (The Post Millennial)
When discussing sex work, professors are obligated to present empirical evidence to support their truth claims. Sadly, some academics use the media to promote an ideological crusade against legalized prostitution. Take, for example, a recent opinion piece in the Toronto Star

Super Channel is suing retailers, customers over TV boxes and pirate content (Global News)
Canadians who bought Android TV boxes from four big-box retailers are among the groups of defendants named in a copyright lawsuit that raises questions about how streaming technology is changing the nature of piracy.

Court rules parts of Canada's prostitution laws are unconstitutional (Omny.fm (AUS) )
Guest Carissima Mathen, Professor of Law at the University of Ottawa, and Author of "Courts Without Cases"

WHO 'can't be trusted,' uOttawa professor on novel coronavirus panel says (Ottawa Sun)
As the World Health Organization dances around the question of whether the novel coronavirus is a pandemic, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa warns that in order to create effective interventions, the public must have a common understanding of the word.

Future of carbon tax? (CTV 2 Alberta (CJAL))
alberta. the reality of alberta's economy, and about alberta's vulnerability within canada, which is the kind of language you don't often see in court decision, and i found that very interesting. >> chelan: ontario judges said it was because fighting climate change is an issue of national concern, saskatchewan largely agree, saying assigning minimum standards falls well within ottawa's jurisdiction. how would you summarize their side of the case. >> the federal government has chosenta somewhat difficult path invoking a national concern doctrine which is rarely accepted, but they're gambling that the evolution of our understanding about environmental concerns is such that the court will accept, in particular, reducing ghg emissions is one such national concern. they initially framed it as very

Release Date: 
Lundi, Février 3, 2020
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