PBSC Projects

How to apply:

Applications are now closed.

Call for Applications: August 30, 2019

Deadline: September 13, 2019 at 11:59 pm

In order to apply, you must:

  • Fill out the online application form 
  • Pick your top 5 projects
  • Submit a CV and cover letter

The application form can be found at this link: here

Types of projects:

Client Assistance and Intake

Client intake and assistance projects involve sitting down with clients of partner organizations or clinics to collect their personal information and the facts of their case, and in some cases, providing them with legal information or helping them complete court forms or other documents.

Legal Research and Writing

Legal research and writing projects include the reviewing and monitoring of pending legislation, writing legal memos or analysing current policy questions, and writing for media such as newsletters or blogs.

Public Legal Education

Public legal education (PLE) placements provide students with an opportunity to develop and deliver legal education materials (e.g., FAQs, info sheets, etc.), workshops and seminars to low and middle-income individuals, newcomers, survivors of violence, and other target audiences. Volunteers will provide legal information in an accessible format about a particular area of law.

Internship

In an internship, a PBSC student is placed with a highly regarded legal organization to perform a series of discrete, legal tasks throughout the program year, supervised by a lawyer. Students will also have opportunities to observe the goings on of the organization and to be integrated into the organization as an “intern.”

2019-2020 Projects

List of organizations:

  1. ACORN - Community Benefits Agreement Research
  2. ACORN – Client Assistance
  3. Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights
  4. Amnesty International - Corporate Accountability
  5. Amnesty International - Legislation and Regulations
  6. Association des juristes d’expression française d’Ottawa
  7. Association of Part-Time Professors of the University of Ottawa
  8. Canada Without Poverty
  9. Canadian Bar Association
  10. Canadian Civil Liberties Association
  11. Canadian Criminal Justice Association
  12. Canadian Federation of University Women
  13. Canadian Health Coalition
  14. Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic
  15. Canadian Red Cross
  16. Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 2626
  17. Centre d’information juridique d’Ottawa
  18. Church Council on Justice and Corrections
  19. Clinique juridique francophone d’Ottawa
  20. Cliquez Justice
  21. Health Professions Appeal & Review Board
  22. ID Project
  23. LEAF
  24. Muslim Family Services of Ottawa
  25. National Council of Canadian Muslims – Internship
  26. National Council of Canadian Muslims – Research
  27. Native Women’s Association of Canada
  28. Nelligan O’Brien Payne
  29. Odawa Native Friendship Centre
  30. Ontario Justice Education Network
  31. The Ottawa and District Injured Workers Group
  32. Ottawa Chinese Community Service Centre
  33. Ottawa Small Claims Court
  34. Public Interest Advocacy Centre
  35. Reach, Equality and Justice for People With Disabilities
  36. Rideau Institute
  37. Sexual Assault Network
  38. St. Leonard’s Society of Canada
  39. Ticket Defence Program
  40. Yukon Human Rights Commission

Projects

1. ACORN Community Benefits Agreement Research

The Organization

ACORN has a deep history of working in low and moderate income communities. Their presence in these communities has enabled them to connect community members -- low and moderate income consumers -- who are most in need, but often hardest to reach, with information about their rights, financial literacy education, tax and benefit services, and leadership development training. By working collectively, they support communities to articulate priorities for addressing their financial needs and accessing fair financial services.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing. Client Intake and Assistance.

The Project

ACORN has been organizing tenants to fight for their rights in Herongate since 2007. Herongate is a working-class, immigrant neighbourhood plagued by negligent landlords. Most recently, tenants' current landlord, Timbercreek Asset Management, from 2016-2018 has mass evicted over 180 families to demolish their affordable family homes to replace them with luxury rentals, siting the units being "beyond repair" as rationale.

ACORN is advocating to create a Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) between the City of Ottawa, Timbercreek, and community groups with a base in the neighbourhood (ie. Ottawa ACORN, South East Ottawa Community Health Centre and the Ottawa District Labour Council). Therefore, students will conduct research on existing CBAs across the country to see what already exists and what the possibilities are. The main question is, given the municipal tools at hand, what kind of CBA can be created in Ottawa?

During the first semester, students will conduct the jurisdictional legal research on CBAs. During the second semester, students will conduct client interviews to collect tenant testimonials on the housing situation in Herongate. Students will organize these meetings by contacting the Herongate residents (from a database provided by ACORN) and conduct 30-60 minute in-person or phone interviews. The final deliverable will be a legal memo summarizing their findings.

Number of students

4 students. One will be the Volunteer Coordinator.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • An interest in social justice
  • A general openness to public interest work
  • An ability to work well under pressure
  • Experience interacting with clients

The following course is an asset:

  • Municipal Law

Location

A workspace will be provided for students at ACORN - 404 McArthur Ave. (Heartwood House) Ottawa, ON, but the work can be done remotely.

2. ACORN - Client Assistance

The Organization

ACORN has a deep history of working in low and moderate income communities. Their presence in these communities has enabled them to connect community members -- low and moderate income consumers -- who are most in need, but often hardest to reach, with information about their rights, financial literacy education, tax and benefit services, and leadership development training. By working collectively, they support communities to articulate priorities for addressing their financial needs and accessing fair financial services.

Type of Project

Client Intake and Assistance.

The Project

Students will assist low-income clients with form filling, hydro credits, and registration for the Canada Learning Bond and other financial entitlements. Students will assist with benefits registrations and will also assist with client outreach to increase the uptake of the City of Ottawa's Equipass (a discounted bus pass for people under the low-income measure). This placement will include direct work with clients, client outreach over the phone and in the field, screening of clients for eligibility for financial entitlements that many low-income households are entitled to but not receiving, and assisting with form filling.

Students will also work at ACORN’s Tax and Benefits clinic which operates every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 3-7 pm during peak tax season (February to May) and at reduced hours during the off season (June-January).

At no point will students be providing legal advice.

Number of students

5 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • An interest in social justice
  • Customer service experience, particularly in overcoming language barriers and mental health challenges (client intake only)
  • An ability to work well under pressure
  • A general openness to working with a diverse client base

Location

Students will be volunteering at ACORN - 404 McArthur Ave. (Heartwood House) Ottawa, ON. Students must be available during afternoons and evenings.

3. Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights

The Organization

Action Canada for Sexual Health & Rights is a progressive, human rights based charitable organization committed to advancing and upholding sexual and reproductive health and rights in Canada and globally.

We are an organization that works in Canada and around the world to promote health, wellbeing, and rights related to sexuality and reproduction. Building on the 50-year legacy of the organizations that formed Action Canada, we provide direct support, referrals, and information to the people who need it most, partner with groups and organizations on a range of campaigns using a collaborative, movement-building approach, and work with decision-makers to advance progressive policies on access to abortion, stigma-free healthcare, gender equality, LGBTQ rights, and inclusive sex-ed.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The project will include research on law and policy related to sexual and reproductive health and rights. This might include: researching legal entry-points for federal action on comprehensive sexuality education, exploring the legal contexts of changes to education curricula, mapping laws and policies across provinces and territories (e.g. on out-of-country access to abortion and/or conscientious objection), and carrying out comparative analyses. The research will be used for internal purposes.

Priorities will be determined by the student and lawyer supervisor, based on interests and organizational need.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred. First year students with relevant experience will be considered.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Knowledge and/or experience working on issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights;
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team;
  • Commitment to sexual and reproductive health and rights (this includes pro-choice values and a commitment to the human rights of all people, including sex workers), equity, anti-oppression, and feminist ways of working.

The following courses are considered an asset:

  • Health Law
  • Human Rights Law

We strongly encourage applications from historically disadvantaged and underrepresented groups, including (but not limited to): People of colour; First Nations, Inuit and Métis people; women; mothers; single parents; newcomers; lesbian, bisexual, gay, two spirit, transgender, gender non-conforming, queer, and questioning people; intersex people; people with disabilities; and those marginalized on the basis of class. Self-identification by candidates is welcomed, but completely voluntary.

Location

Students will be volunteering at 251 Bank St, but flexible working modalities can be discussed.

4. Amnesty International – Corporate Accountability

The Organization

Amnesty International’s mission is to ensure that every person enjoys all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights instruments

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Amnesty International monitors the human rights violations and operational concerns of businesses. Amnesty is constantly looking at a variety of legal, advocacy and reform strategies. The main question of this research project would be to determine what is the role that Securities Regulators can play if there are any human rights violations?

There are two main companies that Amnesty is currently monitoring:

  1. NEVSUN: There were multiple human rights concerns associated with the NEVSUN mine in Eritrea. As a result, a lawsuit was initiated in Canada by Eritreans, and the Supreme Court of Canada heard an appeal in January 2019, pending the release of the decision this Fall.
  2. Polymet: This company is proposing a mine development in Minnesota that is similar to the BC mine Polley. However, Polley suffered a disaster which resulted in massive contamination of a nearby lake and pollution. The planned mine will have similar design and technology, which is a concern.

The student will have the task of exploring the role that Securities Regulators can and should play in ensuring that investors have full access to information associated to publicly traded companies

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Ability to think outside the box
  • Creativity

The following course is useful:

  • Business Law (or equivalent)

Location

Students will be volunteering at 312 Laurier Ave E.

5. Amnesty International – Legislation and Regulations

The Organization

Amnesty International’s mission is to ensure that every person enjoys all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights instruments

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The student will have two main tasks:

  1. Solitary Confinement Regulations

Parliament has recently made reforms to solitary confinement but there have been some concerns as to its adequacy. However, Amnesty International is anticipating regulations to develop to specify the new reforms to solitary confinement. The student will analyse the Act and the Regulations and will identify key areas of concern.

  1. Budget Implementation Act

In the recent adoption of Bill C-97, there was a concerning change to the Refugee Determination System. According to this revision, individuals coming from countries where they have already made a refugee claim undergo a different process than other individuals. Rather than attending a hearing with the Immigration, Refugee Board, those individuals go through the Pre-Removal Risk Assessment process. The Government announced that there will be enhancements to this process to make it more a similar to a hearing. The student’s task will be to monitor the development of the process and analyse the regulations that are made.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Interest in legislation and regulation

The following courses are useful:

  • Refugee and Immigration Law
  • Civil Liberties Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Prison Law

Location

Students will be volunteering at 312 Laurier Ave E.

6. Association des juristes d’expression française de l’Ontario

The Organization

AJEFO increases access to justice in french in order to ensure equal access to justice in both official languages. AJEFO sensitizes, informs and educates lawyer and the public about their rights in matters related to legal services in the official languages of their choice. Jurisource.ca is the only internet site in the world that offers thousands of legal resources and French terminology free of charge to professionals in common law provinces and territories.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The project has three main components:

  1. Blogs: students will draft 3 blogs that will be published on juriblogue.ca. The subjects will be determined depending on the needs of the organization and the interests of the student.
  2. Updating a thematic document: the student will have to update the jurispridemce, the case law and any important publications in the area of immigration law. 
  3. Explanatory document: the student will choose a topic depending on their interests and will draft a 10 page synthesis. The document will be posted on the jurisource.ca website. 

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years.

Language of the project

French. Bilingualism is necessary.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Autonomy and independence

The student has to have taken or currently be enrolled in the course of Immigration Law.

Location

The office is location at 85 Albert Street #1400, but the work can be done remotely.

7. Association of Part-Time Professors of the University of Ottawa

The Organization

The Association of Part-Time Professors of the University of Ottawa (APTPUO) regroups most of the contractual teaching staff of the University. Its 2500 members are sessional lecturers, contractual language or music professors, lawyers, and clinical professionals in Health Sciences. These members include professionals whose work experience enrich programs; and/or students and academics sharing the results of their research with the community.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The APTPUO represents part-time professors at the University of Ottawa. These professors teach half of the courses offered by the University of Ottawa and the majority of the courses offered to undergraduate students.

The APTPUO negotiates their working conditions on their behalf, including the improvement of the learning conditions in the classrooms. Its representatives co-operate with other on-campus social partners, including the Student Federation of the University of Ottawa, for the well-being of the university community. Additionally, the APTPUO offers bilingual services to its members and to the community.

This research will assist greatly with the Association’s efforts to obtain better working conditions. The APTPUO is interested in obtaining the aid of a law student to help with research project on two (2) main subjects:

Conduct research on the difference between Disciplinary measures and Administrative measures, with a focus in the Academic workplace;

Conduct research on Employee’s Rights during investigations in the work place and the role of the investigator

The scope of the student’s research will involve the following:

Students will examine collective bargaining legislation, focusing on the Ontario Labour Relations Act, as well as the Employment Standards Act, and their regulations.

Students will examine decisions of administrative tribunals, courts and boards of arbitration in order to assess how labour law impacts employee’s rights in regards of Disciplinary/Administrative processes or during workplace investigations.

Students may have to analyse other collective agreements in Ontario and the rest of Canada.

The student will have an opportunity to present the completed report to the APTPUO executive.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Interest towards employee rights and the evolution of workplace conditions in Canada
  • Strong research skills
  • Self-starter
  • Ability to follow through on tasks with limited oversight

The following courses are considered an asset:

  • Labour Law (or equivalent)
  • Administrative Law

Location

Students will be volunteering at the University of Ottawa.

8. Canada Without Poverty

The Organization

Canada Without Poverty (CWP) is a non-partisan, not-for-profit, and charitable organization led by a Board of Directors who have a lived experience of poverty. Since 1971, CWP has been championing the rights of individuals experiencing poverty and marginalization through research, awareness-building campaigns, public policy development, educational programming, and the advancement of international human rights obligations. Our goal is to create a Canada where no one faces poverty, homelessness, food insecurity, and inequality.

Type of Project

Internship.

The Project

Students will work primarily on the following projects during their placement:

1. Report Writing: Students will be asked to review laws, policies, and assist in drafting reports on the application of international human rights laws to poverty in Canada.

2. Blogs on poverty: PBSC students may be asked to draft blog articles for CWP’s website on an issue related to the criminalization of poverty, homelessness or food insecurity.  These articles will be published on CWP’s website under the name of student authors. Topics will be determined by the student and supervisor.

3. Legal work: In the 2019-20 school year, CWP may be involved in test case litigation on the rights of people in poverty. This could include work on drafting of materials on issues including panhandling and other laws, which prohibit those experiencing homeless from life-sustaining activities. Students may be called upon by their supervising lawyer, and CWP’s articling student, to assist in legal research and in drafting arguments and submissions.

4. Economic and Social Rights Education: Drawing on the expertise of our Executive Director, Leilani Farha (also the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Housing), CWP offers education programs on economic and social rights. Our materials need to be updated and edited regularly based on reviews based on case law and reviews by the United Nations monitoring bodies. A PBSC student may be asked to assist us in this regard. This will involve: reading and summarizing national and international jurisprudence; researching new audio/visual materials on Economic and Social Rights; assistance with researching and drafting new content areas such as disability and economic and social rights, Indigenous peoples and economic and social rights, etc.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • An interest in international human rights law or advocacy on behalf of people living in property
  • Strong legal research, analytical and writing skills
  • Dedicated students who have the ability to work independently and take initiative throughout the placement

The following courses are useful:

  • Human Rights Law
  • International Law

*In order to avoid potential conflict, Canada Without Poverty will not accept students who either currently work for or previously worked for Canada Revenue Agency or the Department of Justice.

Location

Students will be volunteering at 251 Bank St.

9. Canadian Bar Association

The Organization

The Canadian Bar Association Immigration Law Section seeks to respond quickly and effectively to developments in Canadian immigration law by making submissions to various government bodies. It updates its members on citizenship and immigration law issues.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

As the CBA National Immigration Law Section responds quickly and effectively to development in Canadian immigration law, students will be tasked with helping the Section research and draft submissions, which, following review and final approval by the Section and the CBA, will be submitted to various government bodies, as needed. Students will gain insights into the practice of immigration law, the policy-making process, and public interest considerations in this field.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years. First year students with considerable experience in Canadian immigration law will be considered.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Keen interest in immigration law, in claim paperwork, the situation of immigration families, and the rights of immigrants
  • Ability to understand the issue at hand
  • Professionalism and assiduity
  • Ability to work well in a team
  • Strong writing skills

The following course is mandatory:

  • Introductory courses in immigration and refugee law 

Location

The work will be done remotely.

10. Canadian Civil Liberties Association

The Organization

CCLA fights for the civil liberties, human rights, and democratic freedoms of all people across Canada. We are an independent, national, nongovernmental organization, working in the courts, before legislative committees, in classrooms and in the streets, protecting the rights and freedoms cherished by Canadians and entrenched in our Constitution.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

1. Students will be assigned a particular Canadian jurisdiction to monitor and will do so by reviewing significant reports by rights-protecting and other public bodies. We anticipate assigning students to a province or territory, and might also include the federal jurisdiction and possibly some larger municipalities.

2. CCLA has been compiling a list of links to reports that may be relevant to our mandate. This includes reports from the various jurisdictions’ information and privacy commissions, human rights commissions, auditors general, ombuds, police review office, correctional investigator.

3. Students will be assigned a jurisdiction and provided with at least one report to review. Depending on the length/complexity of the report, students may be assigned more than one report right at the outset.

4. Students are asked to review the report(s) and provide CCLA with a memo (5-7 pages maximum) summarizing the key civil liberties issues that are raised in the report. There will be a deadline for submission of this first memo and students will be asked to categorize the memos according to CCLA program areas and “tag” the memos with relevant keywords. We are still considering the best method for submission of memos (i.e. whether there is a software solution that may be preferable to submission of word docs by email).

5. CCLA may request further research on a particular topic related to the report or may provide the student with a different report to review and summarize as in step 4 above.

6. The purpose of these memos is to allow CCLA to monitor key civil liberties issues in all jurisdictions across the country and consider issues and areas for future advocacy and/or litigation.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • An interest in civil liberties, government accountability, the rule of law and CCLA’s various program areas 

Location

The work will be done remotely.

11. Canadian Criminal Justice Association

The Organization

The Canadian Criminal Justice Association (CCJA) was founded in 1919 and remains an independent national voluntary organization working for an improved criminal justice system in Canada.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing

The Project

The CCJA Legal Research and Policy Analysis project will have (at least) three components:

1. Compilation and analysis of the criminal justice platforms of the major political parties heading into the Fall 2019 federal election, for use in CCJA policy development;

2. Comparative legal research on the use of segregation (punitive and administrative) in prisons in comparable western democracies, and comparison of the systems from these other countries with the system recently enacted in Canada by Bill C-83 (An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and another Act, S.C. 2019, c.27);

3. Participating in the development of briefs and letters for the CCJA regarding the organization’s position on matters of criminal justice policy, which may be utilized by CCJA in their communications to the federal government and the Parliament of Canada.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following course is mandatory:

  • Criminal Law

The following courses are useful:

  • Administrative Law
  • Correctional Law (or equivalent)

Location

The student can choose to work at CCJA (320 Parkdale Ave #101) or do the work remotely.

12. Canadian Federation of University Women

The Organization

The Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW) is non-partisan, voluntary, self-funded organization with over 100 CFUW Clubs, located in every province across Canada. Since its founding in 1919, CFUW has been working to improve the status of women and to promote human rights, public education, social justice, and peace. CFUW Clubs are involved in community outreach on such initiatives as working to prevent violence against women, child poverty, early learning and child care. CFUW holds special consultative status with the United Nations (ECOSOC) and belongs to the Education Committee of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing. Public Legal Education.

The Project

Depending on their interest, students will be able to choose to take on two of the following legal projects:

1.Guide on Preparing By-Laws

Students will be tasked with preparing a guide on how to prepare by-laws for the participating clubs with the CFUW. Students will have to take into account the differences between different provinces and the requirements for each jurisdiction. Please note that the students will not be drafting the clubs’ by-laws themselves, they will simply be preparing a guide/template to be used by the participating clubs.  Should there be demand from the clubs, a webinar might be required to be held on the subject.

2. Benefits and Disadvantages of Incorporating

The act of incorporating involves forming a new business (“company”) that will have the “same rights and obligations under Canadian Law as a natural person (source: Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Corporations Canada). The students will be tasked with performing a province by province analysis of the benefits and the disadvantages of incorporating. Students will have to analyze the requirements for each province, look at previous cases of incorporated companies, and provide an analysis of the benefits and the disadvantages. The final product will be a legal memo.

3. Webinar on Non-Profits

Students will have to conduct research on the legal aspects of Non-Profits, such as relevant regulations, the legal requirements, relevant case law, etc. Students will then have to prepare a webinar that will be presented to the participating clubs at the CFUW. If the viewers have any questions regarding the legal aspects of Non-Profits, students will note them down, and conduct the relevant research to be able to answer the question. The answers will then be reviewed by the lawyer supervisor before being presented to the viewers. At no point during the webinar series will the students be providing legal advice.

4. Accessibility legislation

Following the adoption of Bill C-81: An Act to ensure a barrier-free Canada which received royal assent on June 21st, 2019, students will prepare a legal memo summarizing the Act and assessing the implications that it may have for CFUW.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred. First year students with the relevant experience will be considered. 

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills and experience:

  • Experience working in the non-profit sector
  • Strong interest in women’s issues
  • Independent and a self-starter
  • Strong writing and oral communication skills

The following course is highly recommended:

  • Charities and Non-Profit Organizations

Location

Students will be volunteering at the CFUW location in downtown.

13. Canadian Health Coalition

The Organization

The Canadian Health Coalition is a public advocacy organization that has been working for forty years to protect and expand public health care in Canada. They are comprised of unions, health care workers, community organizations, faith-based organizations and academics, as well as affiliated coalitions in the provinces and 1 territory.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Students will be asked to:

  1. Research legislation, bills and policies in Canada and abroad to assist the Canadian Health Coalition in developing strategic positioning and messaging.
  2. Students may also be asked to follow current legal challenges to the public health system and assist in developing outreach materials.
  3. Students may assist in writing policy memos following the 2019 Federal Elections, and assist with other research tasks.

Students will also have the opportunity to participate in a research roundtable and a lobby day on Parliament Hill where they would meet Members of Parliament and other public health care advocates.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills for this project:

  • Research and writing skills
  • The ability to work independently
  • Self-starter

The following course is highly recommended:

  • Health Law

The following course is considered an asset:

  • Elder Law (or anything equivalent)

Location

The student will be volunteering at 251 Bank St, but most of the work will be done remotely.

14. Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic

The Organization

CIPPIC, the Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic Centre for Law, Technology and Society at the University of Ottawa’s mandate includes three related missions. First, CIPPIC fills voids in policy-making by voicing public interest perspectives to technology policy makers in Parliament, in courts, in regulatory agencies, and in international Internet governance forums. Second, CIPPIC advises clients on technology law matters with a public interest dimension - clients who might not otherwise enjoy legal support. Finally, CIPPIC prepares public education resources and law student training on technology law issues.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

Students will prepare public outreach and public education materials about CIPPIC’s substantive work.  CIPPIC work typically involves preparation and submission of legal materials to courts, tribunals, or legislative committees.  In this project, we will undertake knowledge translation and public education activities to better describe our work and its importance to the lay public.

The project planned for 2019 involves analysis of legal documents using AI tools.  Students will be involved in reviewing legal documents and formatting them (“tagging”) for analysis.  Students work will include interpreting the tool analysis in writing up aspects of that analysis, including preparing outreach and legal education materials on our findings (reports, blogs, etc.).  Legal documents to analyze will include policy submissions, privacy policies and standard form consumer contracts.

Number of students

4 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

N/A.

Location

The CIPPIC office is located in Brooks, but the work can be done remotely.

15. Canadian Red Cross

The Organization

The Canadian Red Cross Society’s mandate is to "improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity in Canada and around the world." The organization is engaged in disaster management, international humanitarian law, overseas humanitarian projects, first aid and safety training, violence prevention, and health services in Canada.

Type of Project

Internship.

The Project

Students will have the opportunity to provide general support to the Legal and Risk Services Team at the Canadian Red Cross Society and assist with discrete legal tasks that support operational activities. Students can expect to assist with providing legal services to CRCS operational departments, including corporate/commercial legal services and notifying clients on upcoming changes to relevant laws and regulatory frameworks. Skill-building activities may include:

  • Legal research and analysis
  • Drafting legal memos
  • Contract review and drafting following the guidelines provided by the lawyer supervisor
  • Meeting with in-house clients in any of the subject areas

All documents drafted will be submitted to the lawyer supervisor for review, revision and final approval. At no point will students provide legal advice.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred. First years with a background working in an office setting related to commercial law will be considered.      

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Solid sense of confidentiality
  • Strong written and oral communication skills
  • Good understanding of the Red Cross structures and movements
  • Previous experience in a legal, corporate or governmental office setting

The following courses are mandatory:

  • Contract Law
  • Commercial Law or Business Organizations

The following courses are useful:

  • Tax Law
  • Charity Law

Location

Students will be volunteering at 400 Cooper St Suite 8000.

16. Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 2626

The Organization

The Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 2626 (CUPE 2626) is the union that represents most students who work at uOttawa – literally thousands of Teaching or Research Assistants, Markers, Tutors, Lab Monitors, Demonstrators, Proctors and even Lifeguards. Unions are associations of workers who promote social justice. They work primarily to ameliorate the quality of life and job conditions of their members.

Type of Project

Internship. Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

CUPE 2626 is currently bargaining in the name of the Teaching and Research assistants with their employer, the University of Ottawa. CUPE is also bargaining for the workers of the Housing Services of the University of Ottawa.

In preparation for the bargaining rounds, the student will a do a comparative analysis of the Financial Aspects of collective agreements at other universities in the province that refer to Research Assistants and Teacher’s Assistants and Housing Services. The student will identify useful aspects that could be used for CUPE2626’s Collective Agreement. Additionally, the student will review the agreement to verify that the links are functioning, to review the order of the clauses, and to identify any missing sections.

The student will also have the opportunity to review the employer’s proposition and sit in on the meetings where employees at CUPE correct the proposition. If the student has any recommendations, it will be reviewed by the Lawyer Supervisor.  The student will also be given the task to monitor the progress of provincial Bill C-124 which could have an impact on future collective agreements. The student will also perform ad hoc legal research tasks as they arise.

At no point will the student be providing legal advice.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Experience in a union setting and/or working for access to justice
  • Possess union values
  • Autonomous and a self-starter

The following course is mandatory:

  • Labour Law

Location

Students will be volunteering at the University of Ottawa.

17. Centre d’information juridique d’Ottawa

The Organization

The Ontario Legal Information Centre (the Centre) offers a free 30-minute meeting with a lawyer to any Ontario resident or any person faced with a legal situation in Ontario. The Centre is a safe space that allows clients to receive essential legal information, to know their options and to establish an action plan to solve their legal issues.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The Centre offers legal information services and free referrals to litigants regardless of their income or the legal issue. Consequently, the lawyers at the Centre have to answer to questions from all areas of law and have to be aware of the changes and developments in the legal field.

The lawyers are sometimes faced with complex questions that require further research. In these cases, the lawyers must follow up with the litigants to offer them the additional information. Therefore, the Centre is looking for a student to conduct this legal research on various legal questions that are asked at the Centre. The project would include research on the relevant legislation and in the jurisprudence in order to understand the state of the law and the legal procedures. Afterwards, the students will have to present their research as a legal note that will serve as reference for the future meetings with the litigants.

At no point will the student be providing legal advice.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years in the French Common Law Program. 

Language of the project

French.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • strong research skills
  • initiative
  • requires minimum supervision

Location

Students will be volunteering at 85 Albert Street #1400.

18. Church Council on Justice and Corrections

The Organization

The Church Council on Justice and Corrections is a national, non-partisan, faith-based coalition, rooted in the Christian tradition.

CCJC’s Mission Statement:  CCJC is a national, faith-based coalition that nurtures healthy community, through the advocacy of restorative approaches to justice, education and social responsibility.

CCJC’s Vision Statement:  CCJC serves to shine a light on restorative approaches to justice and corrections. 

Vision Tagline: We empower communities to explore healing justice.

CCJC’s Mandate: Through research, projects, workshops, and presentations, the CCJC promotes education on restorative justice and sponsors initiatives to build healthier and safer communities.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The student will be able to choose among the following topics:

1. Researching the question:  What will it take to push RJ further into the mainstream?

  • Restorative Justice was born in Elmira, Ontario in 1974.  It has proven effective in the lowering of recidivism and it has given victims a voice.  RJ is often found in different Indigenous communities.  Prison Fellowship International reports that 100 of the 195 countries in the world have restorative activities taking place (http://restorativejustice.org/world-map/#sthash.ZYrf4pKY.dpbs). 
  • However, “The [Canadian]Department of Justice conducted a survey earlier this year [2018]and discovered that over half of Canadians (52 per cent) have little familiarity with what's known as "restorative justice," despite its use in our criminal justice system for over 40 years. (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/opinion-eggleton-saint-germain-restorative-justice-1.4884839)
  • Despite the evidence, interest in and the humanizing of the justice process, why is RJ still a lesser-known justice system?  What will it take to push RJ further into the mainstream?
  • Final product:  an identification of a) what is holding back RJ from becoming more mainstream and b) concrete ideas of how RJ might be pushed more into the mainstream

 

2. Human trafficking research

  • A former CCJC Executive Director encouraged us to do something around human trafficking.  Human trafficking has long been thought to happen in other countries but not Canada. In fact, human trafficking is the second most lucrative crime (https://www.insightcrime.org/news/brief/human-trafficking-is-worlds-2nd-most-profitable-crime-report/) which would indicate that human trafficking will continue and potentially grow. 
  • Recently there were reports of potential attempts at human trafficking taking place in small towns in Ontario:  https://globalnews.ca/news/5718237/boy-chased-white-van-wingham/and https://www.orangeville.com/news-story/9485249-need-to-know-learn-to-identify-a-romeo-pimp-after-viral-facebook-post-about-human-trafficking-recruiters-targeting-orangeville/
  • Humans are trafficked for labour.  When people think about human trafficking, they think primarily about those who work, against their will, in the commercial sex trade.  However, many people who are trafficked end up in slavery situations, whether in construction, manufacturing, mining, domestic work.   (https://www.forbes.com/sites/nicolefisher/2017/04/24/human-trafficking-in-plain-sight/#4f5f8bcf51f8)
  • Let’s come up with some ideas as to how CCJC can contribute to this conversation through a project, research, education …

3. Hate

  • Hate and hate crimes are regularly in the news.  In 2017, “police-reported hate crimes in Ontario increased by 67 per cent … according to Statistics Canada.
    • Hate crimes targeting the Muslim community increased by 207 per cent;
    • Hate crimes against the Jewish population were up 41 per cent;
    • Hate crimes against the black community increased by 84 per cent.
  • In 2018, Ottawa had the distinction of having the third-highest number of hate crimes reported.  (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/ottawa-hate-crimes-statistics-canada-third-worst-1.5220219)
  • What causes hate?  What are types of hate crimes?  Why would someone commit a hate crime?
  • The United Way Ottawa and Synapcity Ottawa have partnered up and are talking about hate; I am trying to get some more details.
  • How can hate and hate crimes be addressed through restorative justice practices? 

4. Comparison of different justice models, including Indigenous (intersections of Indigenous models including community circles with Restorative Justice is particularly important)

  • There are a number of different justice models including the following:  criminal justice system; restorative justice; Indigenous justice; transitional justice; reparative justice; distributive justice; etc.
  • Final product:  a comparison of the different justice models 

5. Researching youth issues for our Youth Empathy Project

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

All years. 

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • strong writing and research skills
  • interest in restorative justice

the following course is an asset:

  • Indigenous Law (or equivalent)

Location

Students will be volunteering at 223 Main St, but the work can be done remotely.

19. Clinique juridique francophone d’Ottawa

The Organization

As part of the Vanier Community Service Centre, the Clinique juridique francophone d’Ottawa offers legal representation to members of the community and offers services in social law, specifically immigration law, housing law, family law and income maintenance.   

Type of Project

Client assistance and intake. Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Under lawyer supervision, the student will attend the legal clinic and meet with clients to help them with notary services. The student will do client intake by asking pertinent questions and document the relevant basic information. Afterwards, using a template provided by the lawyers, the student will draft service notes such as solemn declarations, affidavits and information letters. The lawyer will review the student’s work and will offer constructive feedback and advice. It is also possible that the student will assist with cases related to housing, immigration and social services. At no point will students provide legal advice.

The clinic for notary services runs on Fridays from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm and the clinic for other general services runs on Thursdays from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm. The student should be able to attend both clinics for a combined total of 5 hours.  

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred.

Language of the project

French.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • autonomy
  • strong communication skills
  • experience interacting with the public
  • high level of proficiency in French

Location

Students will be volunteering at 290 Dupuis Road.

20. Cliquez Justice

The Organization

CliquezJustice.ca offers content targeted at Francophone minority communities outside of Québec. Their mandate is to inform the large public clearly and simply their rights and obligations in different contexts that are relevant to the every day life.    

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The student will do research and drafting in order to express legal notions in a clear language adapted to a large public, which will be used as content for the CliquezJustice website. The area of law will depend on the needs of the organization and on the interest of the student. At no point will students be providing legal advice.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred.

Language of the project

French.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Strong writing skills in French
  • Autonomy
  • Research skills
  • Strong communication skills

Location

The work will be done remotely.

21. Health Professions Appeal & Review Board

The Organization

The Health Professions Appeal and Review Board is an adjudicative body with a review and appeal mandate established by provincial legislation under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 (the RHPA). HPARB is responsible for conducting complaint and registration reviews and hearings concerning the Registration, Accreditation and Inquiries, Complaints and Reports Committee decisions of 28 self-regulated health professions in Ontario.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing. Public Legal Education.

The Project

While HPARB decisions are publicly posted on to CanLii, with rare exceptions, they are all in English. To ensure access to key decisions in French, as well as enhancing access to key HPARB cases generally, the Bilingual Access - Complaint Review Headnotes Project is intended to make summaries of selected cases available to the public and to parties on CanLII in English and French.

Reviews of complaint decisions of regulatory health colleges comprise a majority of HPARB’s work, and most of the applicants are not represented. HPARB has a system for identifying key decisions.

HPARB will identify 8 to 12 significant decisions in complaint review matters for headnoting – with both English and French versions being created (as distinct from direct translation).

English and French versions of the headnotes (250-500 words each) would be developed by the students with the HPARB bilingual vice chair, and posted on the CanLII public website. This will provide a significant access to justice contribution by improving French language access to HPARB proceedings, as well as improving access in both languages to leading cases. In addition to the CanLii posting, complications of the Significant Case Headnotes – Complaint Reviews may be posted in English and French on the HPARB website.

Project Components:

  1. The students will work in teams of two (2) to prepare the annotations, and submitting them to the student group coordinator prior to scheduled meetings. There may be special assignments for individual students.
  2. There will also be opportunity to participate as a law clerk for hearings – providing students with direct experience to observe the adjudicative process, including confidential panel deliberations.

All students will be required to sign confidentiality agreements and observe conflict of interest protocols.

Students will develop a number of skills in the following areas:

  • Research and writing
  • Teamwork
  • Administrative law
  • Hearing procedures
  • Professionalism
  • Health law & Public policy

The end goal of the project is to improve accessibility to the law and principles; enhance tribunal work through well-run proceedings, accessible materials and improve focus on public interest issues; orient students to the functions to the Health Boards and the quasi-judicial process; provide insight into health law and administrative law; and provide hands-on plain language/legal writing experience.

Number of students

6 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

Bilingual. Written fluency in both languages is required.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • The ability to work well in a team
  • Strong writing skills
  • Professionalism
  • Positive attitude
  • Punctual and ability to meet deadlines

Location

The work will be done remotely.

22. ID Project

The Organization

This project is a collaboration between PBSC, the Ottawa Mission and Borden Ladner Gervais (BLG).

The ID Project helps the homeless and marginally housed obtain essential identification documentation such as birth certificates, health cards, permanent resident cards, and Ontario photo ID cards. Without official documentation, individuals cannot access many community services and programs. This barrier can create a domino effect that makes it increasingly difficult to address the conditions that lead to homelessness.

Type of Project

Client assistance and intake.

The Project

The ID Project is designed to address the challenge of helping the homeless and marginally housed obtain IDs so they may be able to participate in services around the city. On the third and fourth Thursday of every month, the PBSC volunteer coordinator, one student from PBSC, and one BLG lawyer supervisor, will meet at the Ottawa Mission from 3-5pm. This is a project running from October 2019 until March 2020. Volunteers will check-in at 2:45 pm and have an opportunity to meet their fellow volunteers and set up the space to receive clients. The lawyer will be paired with the PBSC student to assist in interviewing clients and filling out the relevant documentation. On every first Thursday of the month, students will also organize ID clinics at the YMCA.

PBSC students will speak to clients, informing them of the program, how it works, and whom to speak with. When clients ask to speak with a lawyer to fill out the appropriate documentation, PBSC students will make the introductions, sit in on the consultation with the lawyer, and help fill out applicable forms.

Volunteer lawyers will then confirm eligibility requirements with the client and begin filling out either the “Ontario Photo Card - Address Requirement for the Homeless or Marginally Housed Applicants” for photo identification, or the “Agency Assistance Form and Registration for Ontario Health Insurance Coverage” for health coverage. Once the forms are complete, PBSC students will be responsible for making copies of the completed documents and providing them to Ottawa Mission staff at the end of the evening.

It is expected that a diverse range of other legal issues may arise during the course of interviewing clients. Volunteer lawyers and PBSC students are encouraged to make the appropriate referrals if they feel comfortable.

In addition to working at the clinic, students will spend time between shifts on assigned tasks related to running and building the clinic, including file management, developing the referral guide, researching fee waiver options, and exploring expansion options for the project. Students may also be asked to do research and create a guide on obtaining Indigenous ID cards.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

Bilingual.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Experience working with marginalized populations
  • Experience with client intake and interviewing
  • Experience in a clinic setting

Location

Students are required to attend the clinics at the Ottawa Mission at 35 Waller Street and the YMCA.

23. Leaf

The Organization

LEAF works to advance the substantive equality rights of women and girls in Canada through litigation, law reform and public education using the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

Only Yes Means Yes (OYMY) is an educational program designed to educate young people about their legal rights and responsibilities under the Criminal Code in engaging in sexual relations. The workshop focuses in crime of sexual assault, sexting, and consent. In partnership with Leaf Ottawa, students will go to high school class rooms (grades 9-12) across Ottawa and present the OYMY workshops. Students will present 3 workshops per semester.

Following the presentations at the end of the term, students will write a report about their experience. This report will include suggestions to improve the curriculum, challenges they faced and any improvements that can be made with the organization of the workshop (i.e. size of classroom, participation level, etc.). Any new ideas will be presented to the Student Coordinator.

At no point will students be providing legal advice

Number of students

2-4 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Comfort speaking in a classroom setting
  • Strong oral communication skills
  • Experience working with high school students
  • Experience adapting materials to different audiences

Location

The workshops will be given at high schools across Ottawa, and the other work will be done remotely.

24. Muslim Family Services of Ottawa

The Organization

Muslim Family Services of Ottawa (MFSO) is a non-profit community service and mental health organization serving the residents of Ottawa of all communities. Our focus areas include Muslims with mental health issues, vulnerable, marginalized, racialized, and low-income Muslims, and as well as all residents of the downtown core.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education. Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Legal Research Project: What are the ramifications of the cuts to legal aid, in particular refugee and immigration law?

  • Examining how that influences legal clinics in the community
  • Understanding what resources are still available that can support refugees and immigrants with their legal issues
  • What steps can be taken to help individuals with questions on refugee and immigration law
  • What resources can MFSO help create in order to resolve this access to justice crisis

Ottawa-area Islamophobia Research Project 

  • Expanding on our work providing Islamophobia workshops, we wish to assess on a local level the negative effects of Islamophobia on the Ottawa community and how this prejudice manifests itself in various areas (law enforcement, education system, employment, etc.)
  • The student will be responsible for creating a questionnaire to be sent to various social service agencies, government departments, NGOs, and faith and cultural communities in order to better understand these effects. The student will not be responsible for administering the questionnaire due to lack of time in their volunteer position
  • Student will also research what local resources and legal recourses are available to challenge Islamophobia and will create and design workshops based on their legal research in plain language. This workshop will focus on putting the tools of human rights law and other legal recourses in the hands of the Muslim community specifically in Ottawa. It could also be used as a tool for other marginalized groups in our city.
  • Once finalized, the lawyer supervisor will review the workshop. At no point will students provide legal advice or facilitate workshops.
  • The workshop can also significantly be composed of materials collected from existing resources edited and adapted for the specific context of Islamophobia in Ottawa.

Children’s Aid Society Immigration Status Research Project

  • Related to the first research project, this project will build on MFSO’s existing formal partnership with the Children’s Aid Society of Ottawa (CASO)
  • This research project responds to MFSO’s concerns regarding recent high profile cases of former foster care children being threatened with deportation due to their legal status in Canada never being resolved by various child welfare agencies
  • MFSO wishes to work with our partners at CASO to ensure that all children in foster care in Ottawa, including children from the Muslim community, are having immigration status issues resolved while in the care of CASO
  • The role of the researching student will be to understand and compile all existing policies and procedures of CASO as well as relevant other agencies, case law, and legislation related to the immigration, refugee, or citizenship status of children in foster care.

Besides doing documentary research, the student may be required to communicate with colleagues at CASO and make inquiries regarding the above topics.

Number of students

3 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years.

Language of the project

English. French, Arabic, Somali, and Urdu are considered an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Experience with marginalized/racialized populations
  • Knowledge of Islamophobia and social injustices
  • Familiarity with concepts accessible to justice
  • Strong research skills

One to two of the following courses will be useful:

  • Immigration and refugee law
  • Human rights law

Location

Depending on the project, the students will be volunteering at 309 Cooper St Suite 503. Otherwise, the work will be done remotely.

25. National Council of Canadian Muslims – Internship

The Organization

The National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM) is an independent, non-partisan and non-profit organization that protects Canadian human rights and civil liberties, challenges discrimination and Islamophobia, builds mutual understanding, and advocates for the public concerns of Canadian Muslims.

Type of Project

Internship.

The Project

Students will have the opportunity to work directly with NCCM’s Human Rights lawyer to assist with discrete legal tasks. Students may be tasked with legal research, drafting legal memos, assisting with client intake and more.

The Director of Legal Affairs will be undertaking files in the areas of constitutional litigation, judicial review, and criminal law as well as representation before various human rights tribunals. Therefore, tasks may include:

  • Receiving client intake
  • Helping to draft human rights complaints
  • Reviewing disclosure
  • Preparing, drafting, editing, and formatting legal documents

Ideally, there will be one student assigned per shift. The schedule will be determined in late September once the students are selected

Number of students

5 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years. First years will be considered if they demonstrate experience in human rights and employment law.    

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Interest in public service and human rights law
  • Passionate about ensuring that Charter rights and human rights are respected
  • Professionalism

The following courses are mandatory for this placement:

  • Employment Law
  • Human Rights Law

It is important to note that all students can apply for this placement regardless of race, religion or sexual orientation. NCCM is a very diverse and inclusive workplace.

Location

The work will be done at the NCCM office in downtown.

26. National Council of Canadian Muslims – Research

The Organization

The National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM) is an independent, non-partisan and non-profit organization that protects Canadian human rights and civil liberties, challenges discrimination and Islamophobia, builds mutual understanding, and advocates for the public concerns of Canadian Muslims.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Students will assist NCCM with various legal research tasks such as:

  • The triage of cases that come in
  • Criminal Law/Administrative Law/Human Rights Law research
    • Co-drafting academic paper on Webber Academy (ABCA case, leave denied by SCC)
    • Co-drafting academic paper on listing process under section 70 of the Criminal Code
    • Co-drafting academic paper on reform within security agency bodies
    • Co-drafting academic paper on Bill 21 & Bill 62 in Quebec
    • Co-drafting academic paper on challenging evidentiary proceedings before the Federal Court from CSIS

Number of students

5 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years. First years will be considered if they demonstrate experience in human rights law.    

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Interest in public service and human rights law
  • Passionate about ensuring that Charter rights and human rights are respected
  • Professionalism

The following courses are mandatory for this placement:

  • Criminal Law
  • Administrative Law

The following course is considered an asset:

  • Human Rights Law

It is important to note that all students can apply for this placement regardless of race, religion or sexual orientation. NCCM is a very diverse and inclusive workplace.

Location

The work will be done at the NCCM office in downtown.

27. Native Women’s Association of Canada

The Organization

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations, Métis and Inuit women, girls and gender-diverse people within First Nations, Métis and Inuit Canadian societies.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

There have been several countries, such as New Zealand and Colombia, which have given a legal personality to bodies of water. As this is not yet recognized in Canada, the NWAC aims to present a report to the Federal and Provincial Government(s) in order to provide legal rights to bodies of water in the country.

Students will be tasked to complete inter-jurisdictional research to determine whether there are other countries or states that have given legal personality to water; analyse international legislation; provide an overview of the process that was taken by the other countries to achieve that recognition; explore water from an Indigenous perspective; and review relevant case law. Students will have to submit a legal memo to NWAC in March with their findings.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years.    

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Strong foundational knowledge of the issues facing Indigenous communities
  • Cultural competency – student must be able to deal with sensitive material and must demonstrate knowledge or familiarity with Indigenous issues and/or organizations

The following courses are highly recommended:

  • Constitutional Law II
  • Aboriginal Law

Location

The student will be volunteering at 1 Nicholas St.

28. Nelligan O’Brien Payne

The Organization

Nelligan O’Brien Payne is a multi-practice law firm, with a team of over 50 lawyers and over 80 business and support staff. They are unique in the breadth of services we offer as well as the expertise and specialization where it matters. Their size allows us to ensure the right fit and optimal service levels for our clients.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

The students will be given the task of preparing a presentation on the topic of Family Law targeted towards the public who are engaged in or interested in the process of family law matters. Two students will have to collaborate together to create a comprehensive presentation using plain language geared to the general public. Students with the help of PBSC Coordinators will do community outreach and contact local organizations and/or community centres to reserve a space for the presentation. The students will be responsible for confirming with the organizations and determining the logistics. This will consist of 10% of the students work. The purpose is to ensure that low-income families and vulnerable communities have access to the presentation in a comfortable space. 

After the first meeting with the lawyer, the students will pick a presentation topic and conduct research on applicable law, court rules and forms. Once the presentation is finalized, the students will practice their presentation in front of the lawyer supervisor and then will give the presentation in March at the selected location. The exact date of the presentation will be decided in October.

  1. Briefly, the main project goals are to:
  2. Conduct research for the presentation
  3. Brainstorm, as a group, how the information should be presented to have maximum impact
  4. Deliver the presentation in March

At no point will students be providing legal advice.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years.    

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Public speaking or presentation skills
  • Strong Communication skills
  • Ability to collaborate with another student
  • Self-starter

Students have to have taken or be currently enrolled in the course of Introduction to Family Law (either in the French Common Law or English Common Law programs).

Location

The work will be done remotely and the presentation in March will take place in the community.

29. Odawa Native Friendship Centre

The Organization

The mandate of the Odawa Native Friendship Centre is to enhance the quality of life for Indigenous persons in the Capital region; to maintain a tradition of community, an ethic of self-help and development as well as to provide traditional teachings from our elders. They are an organization that offers various programs and services to people of all ages and where "Everyone Is Welcome".

Type of Project

Internship.

The Project

The Odawa Native Friendship Centre offers many programs to their clients. Within the internship, students will have the opportunity to be exposed to these programs and services. Depending on their interests, students can choose to participate with one or more of the following programs and perform legal tasks. Students can assist with research, client assistance, and court accompaniment.

Community Reintegration and Peer Support Program

This is a new program to Odawa. It is a 3 part team who work to support Indigenous persons who are involved in the justice system to connect with community and appropriate supports, avoid breaches, and begin healing. The coordinator connects with individuals via court, probation, parole, OCDC, and develops a wellness plan. Those who require further support to complete the wellness plan will be referred to the Peer Support Worker who will accompany the individuals into the community to attend required meetings and appointments. For all those who are seeking to connect with a knowledge keeper, we refer them to the Traditional Helper who attends Indigenous Peoples Court times for one-on-one’s as needed and at the Odawa Native Friendship Center.

Indigenous Criminal Courtwork Program:

The goal of the program is to assist Indigenous accused to better understand their rights, options and responsibilities when charged with a criminal offence and navigating the legal justice system. On this project, the students will attend the courtworker’s office prior to Indigenous Peoples’ court to assist in preparing documents and updates which will be provided to the court to ensure its’ smooth operations. This will include reviewing the docket, identifying participants who are appearing that afternoon and reviewing those files thoroughly to determine what is occurring that day in court. This will also include contacting community workers and colleagues who have been working with the participants, as well as their defense counsel to ensure all are on the same page. This information is discussed with the Crown Attorney prior to court. During Indigenous Peoples’ Court, the students will be responsible for noting the individual files with updates of court proceedings and the courtworker’s agenda with return to court dates. The students will become very familiar with the files, the accused/participants, court procedures, courtworker and other court personnel responsibilities and duties, Gladue rights and factors, etc.

Indigenous Bail Supervision Program

This program is in partnership with the John Howard Society of Ottawa. The Indigenous bail supervisor attends the courthouse cells to interview referred clients and develops release plans. The plan is then discussed with defense and crown attorney. If the client is released on bail, they meet regularly with the bail supervisor until their matter is resolved or the release dissolves.

Healing and Wellness

The Healing & Wellness Program assists community members with access to traditional medicines, activities and other supports such as treatment center referrals. The Healing & Wellness coordinator also partners with a variety of mental health and counseling services, as well as facilitates Well-Briety Groups. This program is a spiritual support to the justice team.

Cultural Resource Coordinator

The Cultural Resource Coordinator coordinates and supports all aspects of cultural knowledge transfer and planning. The Cultural Resource Coordinator provides traditional teachings and ceremonies and also coordinates access to Elders and Traditional.

Kizhaay Anishinaabe Niin - I Am a Kind Man

Kizhaay provides an opportunity for communities to engage Indigenous men and youth in understanding violence against Indigenous women and support them in joining together to end the violence.  Kizhaay Anishinaabe Niin is an Ojibway phrase that translates to “I Am a Kind Man”. This program runs primary in a group format, but also one-on-ones. Most of the referrals come from court and probation.

Community Justice

The Aboriginal Community Justice Program provides an alternative to court for Indigenous adults who have acquired criminal charges. Via Indigenous Peoples Court in Ottawa, we have also incorporated “informal” diversions.

510

“510” Rideau St is the address and name of Odawa’s Indigenous Drop-In Center, formally named Shawnejeagamik, which means "House of Compassion" in the Algonquin language. Monday thru Friday, 510 is open to all Indigenous community members for breakfast, lunch, and a wide variety of services such as counseling and groups, and laundry and shower services. Many of our court/justice-involved clientele attend at 510 on a regular basis and consider it a comfortable space and home base.

Number of students

4 students.

Who can apply?

All years.  Preference will be given to: Students from Indigenous communities or allies to the community and/or students enrolled in a joint JD/MSW program or with some sort of social work background.    

Language of the project

English. The knowledge of an Indigenous language is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Personable
  • Flexible
  • Professional
  • A self-starter
  • A fast learner
  • Keen attention to detail

The following courses will be considered an asset:

  • Criminal Law
  • Aboriginal Peoples and the Law (or equivalent)

Preference will be given to:

  • Students from Indigenous communities or allies to the community

Students enrolled in a joint JD/MSW program or with some sort of social work background

Location

Students will be volunteering at 815 St Laurent Blvd.

30. Ontario Justice Education Network

The Organization

The Ontario Justice Education Network (OJEN) develops innovative educational tools that introduce young people to the justice system, help them understand the law, and build their legal capability. They work to help prepare young people to manage the legal aspects of problems that arise in their own lives.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

As partner of OJEN, Community Legal Education Ontario has created a legal resource named Steps to Justice (https://stepstojustice.ca/) that provides answers to legal questions on a platform that is organized by legal topic. Steps to Justice answers common legal questions and provides the public with steps on how to proceed.

Following a template provided by OJEN, the student will create a series of legal workshops using the material found on the Steps to Justice website. Students will have to compile the material, adapt it to a younger audience, and create relevant scenarios and possible questions and answers.

Students will not be presenting these or any other materials to any audiences as part of this project.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years.    

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Experience adapting materials to different audiences
  • Interest in social justice and advancing access to justice
  • Experience working with youth
  • Interest in legal education
  • Strong communication skills

Location

The work will be done remotely.

31. The Ottawa and District Injured Workers Group

The Organization

The Ottawa and District Injured Workers Group (ODIWG) provides informational support to injured workers in eastern Ontario primarily in the Ottawa area dealing with workers compensation (W.S.I.B), injured workers rights, and training.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

The students will have the following tasks:

  1. Put together a mock WSIAT tribunal hearing using an existing case (found on the WSIAT decision page) with a student acting as the worker’s counsel and one student representing an employer. Both students would, using the information found on the WSIAT case create a new case including developing arguments in support of their client based on WSIB policy & legislation and other cases with similar arguments on the Tribunal web site. Students will have to give the mock presentation to the supervising lawyer prior to the official event which would be held at the University of Ottawa possibly over a lunch hour to allow other law students and members of the community to attend. This is a public legal education event, aimed at educating the community on the WSIAT process and relevant law.
  2. Develop an action plan for the organization for improved client service delivery based on 2018-19 survey.

Students will also be able to attend a meeting/semester to understand the injured worker community in Ottawa which will allow them to better prepare for the mock WSIAT tribunal. With the assistance of the PBSC Program Coordinators, the students are also responsible for organizing the logistics of the mock tribunal.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

All years.    

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Be able to work independently
  • Have good organizational skills
  • Have good presentation and communication skills

Location

The work will be done remotely.

32. Ottawa Chinese Community Service Centre

The Organization

The Ottawa Chinese Community Service Centre is a non-profit, non-partisan, charitable organization committed to advancing the full social and economic integration and participation of newcomers, immigrants, refugees, and people of all communities in the City of Ottawa.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

Students will be tasked to create a Legal Resource Handbook for Newcomers to Canada which will help newcomers navigate the legal system in Canada. Depending on their interest, students will be assigned an area of law and will have to determine the most valuable parts of that area of law. Once determined, the students will conduct research and draft a plain language resource that will allow newcomers to know where to access legal resources, who to contact in the city, how to navigate the courts, and understand the difference between municipal, provincial and federal laws and regulations. For example, students will address topics such as:

  • How to start a business in Ottawa? The guide will prepare the newcomers with the tools of where to begin, and which sections of the regulations are most relevant.
  • What happens when someone gets a ticket?
  • What are the requirements to become a permanent resident?
  • How to access the Small Claims Court? What kinds of situations require people to go to Small Claims?
  • Are you allowed to change the clauses in a contract if you purchase a vehicle (or any other purchase)?

These are just examples of the types of questions that students will be addressing in the Legal Resource Handbook. The purpose of the manual is to provide the newcomers with the basic knowledge that they would need to get started in the city.

Students may also have the opportunity to participate in community outreach and contact law firms to present sessions to the public with the students. Students may also have the opportunity to present their research in a Legal Education Webinar organized by the OCCSC. At no point will students be providing legal advice; the content presented will solely be legal information.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred.

Language of the project

English. Chinese is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Be able to work independently
  • Have good organizational skills
  • Have good presentation and communication skills
  • Strong research skills

Location

Students will be volunteering at 400 Cooper Street #2000.

33. Ottawa Small Claims Court

The Organization

In Ontario, the Small Claims Court is a branch of the Superior Court of Justice. It deals with civil disputes of a monetary value of up to $25,000 (Canadian).

Type of Project

Internship.

The Project

The objective of this project is to continue the partnership between the East Region Deputy Judges of the Small Claims Court and the University of Ottawa (Common Law) Chapter of Pro Bono Students Canada. The main purpose is to provide a valuable and practical learning experience for law students interested in civil litigation.

Students will be able to shadow multiple judges while they sit on trials, conduct settlement conferences (similar to mediation), and sit on motions. The cases will be diverse, and include cases such as defamation and wrongful dismissal for example. Students will have the unique opportunity to review the upcoming case files and attendance in Court, and spend time discussing the trial/decision with the judge afterwards. The student will be able to shadow different judges to be able to experience the different styles and personalities of the judges.

Depending on the availability of cases, the student may have the chance to follow a specific difficult case from the beginning to the end. There may be an opportunity to conduct legal research for the judges in preparation for the cases.

This experience will instill in the law student the value of pro bono work as he/she will be exposed to the difficulties faced by self-represented parties, as well as the challenges posed to the civil justice system by unbalanced representation.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Discretion
  • Interest in learning about civil litigation

Location

Students will be volunteering at the Elgin Courthouse.

34. Public Interest Advocacy Centre

The Organization

The Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC) provides legal and research services on behalf of consumer interests and, in particular, vulnerable consumer interests, concerning the provision of important public services. PIAC works to ensure that government and the private sector consider the public interest, consumer rights, as well as values like diversity and equal opportunity, when making decisions about public services that are vital to participation in society.

Type of Project

Internship. Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The student will assist in projects related to PIAC’s ongoing consumer advocacy and work on regulatory law. In particular, the student will assist with preparing submissions and summarizing public comments for the CRTC’s Telecom and Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2019-57: Review of mobile wireless services.  The student will assist with a public hearing scheduled for January 13th, with the option to sit in on the hearing, by conducting preliminary research, summarizing party positions and assisting in drafting the final submission. Additionally, the students will partake in ad hoc research tasks related to privacy and competition law.

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred. First years who show a strong interest in regulatory law will be considered.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Experience writing different kinds of materials (academic papers, blog posts, informal pieces)
  • An appreciation for public interest work
  • The ability to work independently
  • Self-starter

The following course is considered an asset:

  • Administrative Law

Location

Students will be volunteering at 285 McLeod Street, Suite 200.

35. Reach, Equality and Justice for People with Disabilities

The Organization

Reach is an organization that works for equality and justice for people with disabilities through a legal referral service and regular educational seminars. Reach maintains a list of lawyers, paralegals and mediators who have agreed to provide up to 3 hours of free legal advice for clients with disabilities.

Type of Project

Client Assistance and Intake.

The Project

The students will work on-site at the Reach office between 9am-2pm for a 3.5-5 hour shift on a designated day between Mondays and Thursdays. The shifts will be from either 9:00-12:30 or 10:30-2:00pm. Students will answer phone calls and speak to individuals with diverse disabilities (or their family members or frontline workers) who require legal assistance. Students will ask the relevant questions and record the important facts on the Clio database. Students will then determine if a matter should be referred to a) non-legal agencies, b) community legal agencies or c) private legal practitioners or mediators that are better suited to meet the client’s needs. Students may also match clients with a lawyer/mediator/paralegal whose specialization makes him/her qualified to assist with the case. Students may also assist clients with disabilities submit online complaints to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

Students will also have the unique opportunity to attend Legal Referral and Educational Clinics organized by Reach taking place in multiple different organizations and assist with in-person client intake.

Other tasks include: entering client information in database, entering legal professional’s information in a database, recording file progress, conducting research on resources in the community, and writing an article with WithinReach, Reach’s newsletter.  

Number of students

6-8 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred. First years with relevant experience will be considered.

Language of the project

English. Priority will be given to bilingual students.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Excellent interpersonal skills (confidence in answering phone calls; speaking with clients about sensitive issues; speaking to legal professionals)
  • Customer service experience is an asset
  • Sensitivity to people with disabilities
  • Professionalism
  • Experience working with vulnerable populations is an asset
  • Preference will be given to students who will remain in Ottawa during the January term

Students must be available for a 5-minute phone call on September 16th.

Location

Students will be volunteering at 554 King Edward Ave. 

36. Rideau Institute

The Organization

The Rideau Institute conducts independent policy relevant research and analysis to decision makers, opinion leaders and the public to assist them to knowledgeably participate in the national debate on foreign and defence policy. Our advocacy is based on an abiding commitment to creative, innovative and inclusive multilateralism, strengthening the UN and building international law. 

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

The student will have to produce a report into the legal and policy implications of the sweeping unilateral “sanctions” (actually economic countermeasures) enacted by the Trump administration against Iran and Venezuela, which also include secondary sanctions – that is, extraterritorial application to third parties in order to force them to follow suit.  The report should also consider the unilateral measures Canada has introduced against Venezuela and Iran under the Magnitsky Act.

Research Tasks include:

  • Research the legality of these measures and explain the main results in written form concisely and clearly
  • Identify and assess potential legal courses of action for states in response (eg. blocking statutes, bringing the case before the WTO or the ICJ)
  • Evaluate the impact on international law
  • Identify any policy options that Canada might consider to mitigate any negative impacts

Number of students

1 student.

Who can apply?

Upper years. Preference will be given to students currently pursuing their LLM or PhD in International Law.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • A deep interest in public international law
  • Academic background in international studies

 The following course is mandatory:

  • Public International Law

The following course is an asset:

  • International Humanitarian Law

Location

Students will be volunteering at 63 Sparks St, but the work can also be done remotely. 

37. Sexual Assault Network

The Organization

The Sexual Assault Network’s mandate is to facilitate and promote collaboration among service providers through: community engagement, knowledge exchange, violence prevention, professional development, and working jointly with partners in the area of sexual violence.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Since 2013 the Sexual Assault Network has been collaborating with Pro-bono Ontario students to analyze the language used in Ontario adult sexual violence court decisions as part of the Ottawa Judicial Language Project (JLP).   The project is based on the work done by New England Law School (Boston) and the research of Linda Coates and Allan Wade. The project is primarily research based and has the goal of identifying ways in which language: i) conceals violence ii) mitigates offender responsibility iii) blames and pathologizes victims and iv) conceals victim’s resistance.

Foundationally, the project looks to capture the language used in law since the legal system is a major contributor to shaping social norms and also reinforces the unconscious bias of judges and legal professionals reading decisions and case law.  The project looks to explore problematic terms/concepts while also highlighting best practices and accurate language used to describe sexual violence.

The final deliverables for the project will be:

  1. Policy Paper (Problematic and Accurate Language used in Ontario Court Decisions).  This will include an executive summary, methodology,  results, discussion, recommendations (this will developed with the Advisory) and a copy of the decisions reviewed;
  2. Advocacy Letters.  The student(s) will complete a ‘key term’ search for problematic terms (to be determined by the Advisory) and then complete our template letters to Chief Justices of Appeal for a minimum of 5 provinces.

Number of students

2 students.

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Acquainted with the dynamics of sexual assault and abuse
  • Experience volunteering/working in a feminist organization, or feminist theory.
  • Knowledge of discourse and/or qualitative analysis.
  • Knowledge of how language is a factor in court cases.
  • Legal research skills (i.e. WestLaw searches).
  • Report writing and communication skills.

The following course is mandatory:

  • Criminal Law

The following course is highly recommended:

  • Sexual Assault/ Violence Against Women and the Law

Location

The work will be done remotely.

38. St. Leonard’s Society of Canada

The Organization

The mandate of St. Leonard’s Society of Canada (SLSC) is to promote humane and informed justice policy and responsible leadership to foster safe communities.

Type of Project

Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

According to their interest, students will be able to choose to complete one of the following research projects:

1. Internal Policy Review and Development

The student will be given a Policy topic and will conduct background research, research on the issue and help develop resolutions as to how advocacy should be tailored. Examples of previous policies can be found on the website: http://www.stleonards.ca/slsc-policies/.

2. Youth Justice

The student will work with SLSC to support the National Youth Justice Network (NYJN) to advance efforts to identify evidence-based links between youth justice issues and other social justice issues (such as homelessness). This will inform how the NYJN can undertake advocacy activities/member recruitment from an informed perspective. Students will also be asked to consider how the Youth Criminal Justice Act and the obligations under this Act may impact social issues outside of youth justice (i.e. “off-ramps” from justice/corrections are mandated by the Act, but where do the off-ramps lead?)

3. Care of Aging/Elderly Prisoners

The student will conduct research to determine the level of care that is offered to aging/elderly prisoners in regards to mobility issues and end of life care. The student will have to determine if prisons are meeting the standard duty of care for the individuals affected. The student will also analyze human rights violations based on the capacity, or lack of, health services that are offered for prisoners.

4. Coalition to Reform Access to Health Care and Segregation in Ontario jails

The student will work with SLSC to support Coalition activities in raising awareness about the harmful effects of segregation, and, the importance of adequate healthcare in Ontario jails. This will involve researching best practices in other jurisdictions, as well as synthesizing provincial court decisions on the practice of segregation. Potential to inform SLSC on advocacy related to Bill C-83 (Structured Intervention Units) for federal prisons. 

Number of students

1-2 students.

Who can apply?

All years.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Ability to work independently
  • Strong reading comprehension
  • Strong writing skills

Location

Students will be volunteering at 211 Bronson Ave #208 Please note that SLSC is a dog-friendly office, however, dogs can be kept at home for days that student volunteers are in if needed.

39. Ticket Defence Program

The Organization

The Ticket Defence Program (TDP) is a community-based devoted to providing legal information and basic legal information and services to homeless people and people who are otherwise street-involved. They provide representation before the provincial courthouse. TDP accepts two categories of tickets: provincial offences that target people living on the streets and municipal offences that target people who live on the streets or are unstably housed (e.g., having open liquor, trespass, aggressive panhandling, etc.).

Type of Project

Public Legal Education.

The Project

TDP is also actively involved in community outreach and public legal education. Students will have the opportunity to sit on its Community Outreach Committee (COC) and assist with researching and writing policy papers and legal commentary on issues impacting homeless and street-involved communities.

Each student will be assigned one research topic, and a third student will act as Volunteer Coordinator. The research topics are as follows:

  1. Research into best practices for public legal education and development of tools for TDP to conduct education and intakes. The final product will be a best practices sheet that will be reviewed by the lawyer supervisor and shared with the volunteers upon approval. The objective will be to improve efficiency of the program and to create best practices for client intake and education and how to transmit legal education in an accessible way.
  2. Development and improvement of in-house training materials on the acts, regulations and procedures most relevant to TDP and its clients (e.g. Safe Streets Act, etc.) and creation of simple process charts for use in legal education. All final products will be reviewed by the lawyer supervisor.

Students may also have the opportunity to develop public legal education materials and deliver presentations to homeless and street-involved individuals and/or service providers. Students may also be invited to engage with community partners such as shelters and other service providers to raise awareness of issues impacting homeless and street-involved communities and to promote TDP’s services (constituting 20% or less of the students’ hours).

Role of the Volunteer Coordinator

The Volunteer Coordinator will be responsible for conducting substantive research for both projects and for overseeing the projects. The coordinator will:

  • Coordinate with other students on the project, monitor their progress throughout the placement, and answer their questions where possible
  • Be responsible with ensuring that the students’ policy paper work meets the deadlines 

Number of students

3 students. One will act as the Volunteer Coordinator.   

Who can apply?

All years. The Volunteer Coordinator must be an upper year.

Language of the project

English. Bilingualism is an asset.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Legal research and writing
  • Presentation making skills
  • Prior community outreach experience
  • Basic understanding of poverty issues, along with a genuine desire to learn more about homelessness

The Volunteer Coordinator must:

  • Have a demonstrated ability to work with people
  • Strong writing and editing skills
  • Ability to produce polished and professional-quality deliverables

Location

Students can do the work remotely, or use the TDP on the University of Ottawa campus if necessary.

40. Yukon Human Rights Commission

The Organization

The mandate of the Yukon Human Rights Commission is to promote equality and diversity through research, education and enforcement of the Yukon Human Rights Act.

Type of Project

Public Legal Education. Legal Research and Writing.

The Project

Students will work on a series of discrete research projects, with individual questions to be provided by the Director. Students will provide case comments, memos and complete short research assignments on a variety of areas relevant to the Commission.

This year’s PBSC teams will be working in support of active systemic human rights litigation, complaint settlement and investigations, and public legal education. A tight pre-set schedule of meetings has been established in advance. Students are expected to take oral instructions followed by an assignment shortly thereafter. There will be several short research projects of approximately 20 hours each, which will be assigned throughout the year to each student individually with about 4-6 weeks turnaround. Emphasis for research projects will be on substantive knowledge, case law searches, and draft memoranda.

The meeting and assignment schedule is below, and attendance at the video-conference meetings is mandatory. All times are Pacific Time. These meetings do not take the place of general training or other trainings required by the chapter.

Deliverables

 

Meeting Dates

 

September 27, 2019 – Deadline for student bios and statement of interest

October 1, 2019 12:30-2pm

Initial meeting, Assignment #1 provided

October 25, 2019 – Assignment #1 deadline 9am

October 29, 2019 12:30-2pm

Project meeting, Assignment #2 provided

November 22, 2019 – Assignment #2 deadline 9am

November 26, 2019 12:30-2pm

Project meeting, Assignment #3 provided

January 24, 2020 – Assignment #3 deadline 9am

January 28, 2020 12:30-2pm

Project meeting, Assignment #4 provided

February 21, 2020 – Assignment #4 deadline 9am

February 25, 2020 12:30-2pm

Project meeting, Assignment #5 provided

March 27, 2020 – Assignment #5 deadline 9am

Final project deadline for any outstanding work.

March 31, 2020 12:30-2pm

Final project meeting, debrief and final feedback.

Number of students

1-2 students.    

Who can apply?

Upper years preferred.

Language of the project

English.

Prerequisites and Assets

The following are strongly desired skills:

  • Grounding in legal research and writing methodology and practice
  • Independent professional work habits
  • Students must have an appreciation for the impact of their work within a team environment
  • Ability to manage their own time and workload to meet deadlines and project expectations

All project meetings are mandatory.

The following courses are an asset:

  • Administrative Law
  • Employment Law
  • Domestic Human Rights Law

Strong preference is for upper year students, or first years coming to law school with graduate school experience and advanced legal writing skills. It is an asset to have substantive knowledge in areas of law relevant to the Commission’s core mandate, such as: administrative law, employment law, human rights law, disability and health law, Indigenous law and legal orders, constitutional law and the Charter, and prison law. Other asset knowledge areas include: Yukon First Nations and Umbrella Final Agreements, feminism and the law, LGBTQ2S+ legal issues, human rights in corrections, racial equality, poverty and housing, newcomers to Canada, language rights, religion and the law, and legal issues related to diversity and equality, as well as other areas related to our mandate. Lived experience relevant to the work of the Commission is also an asset.

Location

The work will be done remotely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

pbsc logo

Contact us

Jacintha Gedeon and Krisa Cunaj
Program Coordinators

Phone: 613-562-5800 ext. 3291

Send us an email at

          probono@uottawa.ca

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